St. Stephen's Epsicopal Church

An Episcopal church in Wyandotte, MI
St. Stephen's Epsicopal Church

Plan Your Visit

Services

Address
2803 1st St
Wyandotte, MI 48192

Phone
734-284-8777

Website

Directions
Get directions on Google Maps

Who We Are

If you're looking for a church home where you can experience God in worship, make new friends, and help the community, we invite you to join us some Sunday. We welcome you whether you are new to faith or have been in church all your life, full of doubt or firm in your faith, young or old, rich or poor, LGBTQ or straight, full of joy or consumed by sorrow. Whoever you are and wherever you are on your journey, you are welcome here.

We are a small but vibrant congregation, full of God's love and the Holy Spirit. We collaborate with other local churches to serve the community through feeding ministries, a food pantry, and food and clothing baskets at Christmas. We are a bunch of imperfect people trying to find where our deep gladness meets the world's deep hunger. As new people become part of our community, we change and grow in new and unexpected ways.

We are located in downtown Wyandotte, Michigan, at 2803 First Street (corner of First and Chestnut). There is some parking in front of the church on First Street, and there is a municipal parking lot just across Chestnut Street from the church. We offer wheelchair accessible entry, seating, and restrooms. We have an elevator to help you get from one level of the church to the next. Our downstairs restrooms are gender inclusive.

About Us

Vibe
Casual, Traditional Liturgy, Down to Earth, Downtown, Old-school, Spirit-filled, Friendly, Inclusive, Historic, Multigenerational

Programs
Community Service, Adult Education, Food Pantry, Seniors Ministry

Music
Traditional Hymns, Organ, A capella

Denomination
Episcopal

Networks

Size
Small

Founded
1860

Contact

Address
2803 1st St
Wyandotte, MI 48192

Phone
734-284-8777

Website

Directions
Get directions on Google Maps

Our Services

What are services like?
We are an Anglican/Episcopal Church that uses mainly the Book of Common Prayer. We strive for unity through diversity, which means that you may find some people standing to pray while others kneel, some people saying the traditional Lord's Prayer while others say the contemporary version, and so on. Our service includes readings from the Bible, prayers for our community and the world, traditional but upbeat hymns, a sermon that breaks open God's word in a way that makes sense for today, and a focus on the Holy Eucharist as the center of our weekly gathering. All are welcome at God's table to take the bread and wine.

What is the community like?
We have many older members who are vibrant and active and full of wisdom. We have a few young families, single and widowed people, gay and straight and trans and cis. We are a pretty diverse bunch. We love to share meals together and we have an active Men's Club and Episcopal Church Women group.

What if I'm not a Christian?
Everyone is beloved in God's site, regardless of what they believe. We strive to emulate God's extravagant love and radical hospitality to everyone who comes through our doors. If you have questions about faith or about Christianity in particular, you'll find that we do, too - and you're more than welcome to come and wrestle with those questions with us.

Leadership

Andrea Morrow
Priest

My passion is helping people transform their lives. I was ordained a priest on December 12, 2015, in the Episcopal Diocese of Michigan. I am also Director of Writing Programs at the University of Michigan Stephen M. Ross School of Business. I didn't grow up in the church. In fact, I am a third-generation unchurched person who lived a mainly secular life until I was in my mid 30s, when I had an unexpected and wholly inexplicable encounter with the Divine. As a secular academic and big fan of postmodernism, I'm not your typical church person - but I've come to realize there is no such thing. Christians are all called to ministry through baptism, and that means there are as many different kinds of "church people" as there are people. I believe God loves all of us and is that in which we live and move and have our being - but I also know that the church is an institution composed of imperfect people (like me!) which has (sometimes inadvertently and sometimes purposefully) caused great harm to other people. Christendom (the fusion of imperial nationalistic and later corporate interests with Christianity) has wreaked havoc on the world and left many people skeptical of the value of following Jesus. We live in a time when Christianity has for seventeen centuries been the religion of empire. When it has become hard to hear the subversive, revolutionary nature of Jesus’s message, because it has been so thoroughly co-opted by those in power to legitimate their control. My call is to help people "open the ears of their hearts" to hear the revolutionary nature of Jesus's vision of the kingdom of God and to understand what it means to us today.

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