• St Paul's
  • St Paul's
  • St Paul's
  • St Paul's
  • St Paul's
  • St Paul's
  • St Paul's
  • St Paul's
  • St Paul's
  • St Paul's
  • St Paul's
  • St Paul's
  • St Paul's
  • St Paul's
  • St Paul's

Who We Are

An Inclusive and Progressive Community of Faith

The Vision of St. Paul’s Church

We are one people of God who see Christ in all persons,
celebrate the mystery of God’s love for all,
break down barriers that separate us from one another,
provide a home for everyone on their spiritual journey,
and equip the saints to do ministry in the world.

Denomination
Episcopal

Networks

Size
Medium

Founded
1901



Our Services

Service Times

Sunday
  • 08:00am - Members who get up early enjoy our 8:00 a.m. Sunday service, which is a quiet service with little to no music. More contemplative in nature, it offers parishioners a chance to immerse themselves in the liturgy in the quiet of the morning.
  • 10:15am - The 10:15 a.m. choral Eucharist on Sunday mornings is popular with families and those seeking more fellowship in their worship experience. The Service of the Altar is usually chanted at least in part, and our choir leads us in music from the 1982 Hymnal as well as a more contemporary hymnal, the Gather Hymnal. They are regularly accompanied by organ, piano, violin, guitars and flutes. We enjoy the use of contemporary as well as traditional liturgies, striving always to honor the mystery and sacredness of the Eucharist. We have come to understand that it is in each person's uniqueness that we become acquainted the image of God. As a result, we embrace our human-ness in our worship services rather than striving for a regimented idea of perfection.

What to Expect

What are services like?
Worship Styles Episcopalians worship in many different styles, ranging from very formal, ancient, and multi-sensory rites with lots of singing, music, fancy clothes (called vestments), and incense, to informal services with contemporary music (St. Paul's style happens to be a tasteful blend of both). Yet all worship in the Episcopal Church is based in the Book of Common Prayer, which gives worship a familiar feel, no matter where you go. Liturgy and Ritual Worship in the Episcopal Church is said to be "liturgical," meaning that the congregation participates in the service (liturgy is a Latin word literally translated as "work of the people") and follows service forms and prays from texts that don't change greatly from week to week during a season of the year. This sameness from week to week gives worship a rhythm that becomes comforting and familiar to the worshipers. At St. Paul's we like to mix it up a little more than some, though the "look and feel" remains the same. For the first-time visitor, liturgy may be exhilarating... or confusing. Services may involve standing, sitting, kneeling, sung or spoken responses, and other participatory elements that may provide a challenge for the first-time visitor. However, liturgical worship can be compared with a dance: once you learn the steps, you come to appreciate the rhythm, and it becomes satisfying to dance, again and again, as the music changes.

What is the community like?
The Episcopal Church strives to live by the message of Christ, in which there are no outcasts and all are welcome. Walking a middle way between Roman Catholicism and Protestant traditions, we are a sacramental and worship-oriented church that promotes thoughtful debate about what God is calling us to do and be, as followers of Christ.

What if I'm not a Christian?
All Are Welcome All who seek God and are drawn to Christ are welcome at the Table at St. Paul's. This is not an Episcopal meal - this is our Lord's meal, and He bids you, Welcome!


Leadership

Kathleen Kingslight

Kathleen Kingslight


What Members Say

Add your voice
  • Gordon Glick
    I don't know, but I was raised as an Episcopalian, my Mother's faith. My Father was of Ashkenazi Jewish tradition, but a '30s kid, served in WW2. I was born in Queens, NYC, raised in BKLYN, moved around the country, and was absorbed by the Army in 1972. Nevermind all that. I was a Chorister in the church of St. Paul's, in the Village of Flatbush, as a second treble. I am currently an atheist, though not doctrinaire. I miss the music, of which I was adept without learning how to read. My range is now indeterminate, but sort of broad. No Counter-tenor, but still sort of up in the register. No Basso, but can get down low when needed.
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