Saint James' Episcopal Church

Episcopal, School, Community, Inclusive, Social, Music, Prayerful, Outreach Warrenton, VA
Saint James' Episcopal Church

Who We Are

Saint James’ Episcopal Church is a vibrant, growing congregation located in Old Town Warrenton. While we are proud of our heritage as a cornerstone in the community we also celebrate that God makes all things new. In recent years we have welcomed countless new families and have celebrated the gifts and spirit they have brought to the church.

Despite our increasing numbers, many comment that the strong sense of community attracted them to the church. You will experience a warmth and energy when you walk through the doors. People here are excited about their parish, committed in their faith, and want to make a difference in people’s lives.

Saint James’ offers a wide range of opportunities for ministry, spiritual growth, and the forging of deep and abiding relationships.

Additionally, the parish has an active and growing preschool and elementary day school (SJES), youth groups, children’s programing, and nursery program, which account for the growing number of young members.

About Us

Vibe
Traditional Liturgy, Progressive, Gay affirming, Inclusive, Multigenerational, Lots of kids, Young families

Programs
Community Service, Addiction/Recovery, Children's Ministry, Youth Group, Choir, Missions, Yoga/Meditation, Nursery, Adult Education, Food Pantry, Preschool, School

Music
Traditional Hymns, Organ

Denomination
Episcopal

Size
Medium

Language
English

Founded
1730

Plan Your Visit

Services

Contact

Address
73 Culpeper St
Warrenton, VA 20186

Phone
(540) 347-4342

Website

Directions
Get directions on Google Maps

Our Services

What are services like?
Worship at Saint James’ is Eucharistic. Eucharist is an ancient Greek word for “thanksgiving”. We gather each week and share a meal of bread and wine in thanksgiving for Christ’s loving sacrifice of his body and blood upon the cross. Our form of worship has changed little over the centuries, and we continue this practice because Jesus invites us to share his body (bread) and blood (wine) in remembrance of him. When we gather, we prepare ourselves to receive God’s grace, we come to the table shoulder to shoulder in communion (as a community) with one another and with Christ, and are immediately sent to share that grace with the world. Worship at Saint James’ is corporate. We worship God together. What does that mean? It means we are not passive participants in the worship of God. Of course, you could stay seated and quiet throughout our service, but you would miss out on a great opportunity to participate. Our worship is taken directly from the Book of Common Prayer (BCP) found in the rack in front of each pew. In 1549 the first Book of Common Prayer was groundbreaking in that it was in the language of the people and encouraged people to be active participants in worship. We unite our voices to the glory of God through Jesus Christ by the power of the Holy Spirit. Worship at Saint James’ needs everyone. Why? Because everyone has a role to play! The clergy act as masters of ceremonies, or prompts, if you prefer, guiding everyone through prayers and singing. They teach, preach, and lead everyone in the celebration of the Holy Eucharist, which is why they are called “celebrants”. The choir supports us all as we sing together. Members of the congregation, called the laity (or laypersons or laypeople) lead readings from the Bible, and help the clergy by serving as acolytes, crucifers (cross bearers), and chalice bearers and servers in Holy Communion. At all times, worship is a corporate and cooperative experience; it is never a “one-person show.” Worship at Saint James is sacramental. We find our identity rooted in the sacrament of Baptism, which is full initiation by water and the Holy Spirit into Christ’s body, the church (BCP 298). Sacraments are outward and visible signs of inward and spiritual grace, given by Christ as sure and certain means by which we receive that grace (BCP 857). Through sacraments we experience the presence and grace of God. Thus to be sacramental is to believe the grace of God is made present in the world, particularly in worship and the sacraments of Baptism and Eucharist. Our experience of these sacraments governs our worship and our worldview, since through them we know God is not distant but present with us in these acts and in the world.

What is the community like?
Despite our increasing numbers, many comment that the strong sense of community attracted them to the church. You will experience a warmth and energy when you walk through the doors. People here are excited about their parish, committed in their faith, and want to make a difference in people’s lives.

What if I'm not a Christian?
First of all, you are welcome! Whether you have spent your entire life in an Episcopal pew or have never stepped foot in any church, you are free and encouraged to worship with us or simply to listen to our liturgy. At various times in a service, people may stand, sit or kneel – all of this has a meaning, but never feel as though you have to do anything. We are overjoyed that you chose to come join us. There is no need to do anything else except whatever makes you feel most comfortable. You are welcome, simply and purely. There are no caveats.

Leadership View all

Ben Maas

Ben Maas

Ben joined us in February 2013. He returned to Virginia after serving his first ten years of ordained ministry in Louisville, Kentucky. A graduate of the University of Virginia, Ben is still not sure how he ended up at Virginia Theological Seminary in the fall of 2000, but each year in parish ministry convinces him that the Holy Spirit had something in mind (and a pretty good sense of humor). He stands in awe at the extent to which a community of faith cares for one another and for the stranger.

What Members Say Add your voice

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