For People of Faith, Michael Brown’s Death Is a Cosmic Tragedy

An event like this should help us hear God’s invitation to us to break down human boundaries.

How are we to understand Michael Brown and Ferguson from the point of view of faith?

Speaking as a Christian, I would begin with the premise that any attempt to understand the Michael Brown story must start from respect for him, his body, and his story. In the baptismal service of the prayer book of my church, the Episcopal Church, we promise to “strive for peace and justice among all people” and to “respect the dignity of every human being.” I am bound to start with respect for Michael Brown and the hope that he be given justice. The story is about nothing less than that.

When I first heard the news of Michael Brown’s death, I could not help remembering “Brown Baby,” a song written by Oscar Brown, Jr. in 1961 and later made famous by Nina Simone and Diana Ross. Brown’s song was written in the middle of the most hopeful and violent moments of the Civil Rights Movement. You can feel the mixture of hope, anger, and fear as the black parent addresses a newborn child.

As you grow up I want you to drink from the plenty cup

I want you to stand up tall and proud

And I want you to speak up clear and loud

Brown Baby Brown Baby Brown Baby

As years go by I want you to go with your head up high

I want you to live by the justice code

And I want you to walk down freedom’s road

You little Brown Baby

Because all faith traditions hold human life sacred, both individually and collectively, the religious questions raised by Michael Brown’s death begin as they must in grief for the cutting off of a young human life by violence, whatever its cause. When we look at video images of Mr. Brown lying dead in a Ferguson street, it is hard not to think back to Oscar Brown Jr.’s hope that his child would “stand up tall and proud” and “drink from the plenty cup.”

Before it is anything else, Michael Brown’s death is a human tragedy. But for people of faith, human tragedies are also social and cosmic tragedies. We believe that human beings matter not only to each other but to God. So the injustice and oppression inherent in any American inter-racial killing is a theological concern.

For Jews, Muslims, and Christians, God is invested in the health and rightness of human social relations. The killing of anyone is a human tragedy, and the killing of anyone because of racial, economic, political, or social injustice is a matter of urgent theological concern. I want you to live by the justice code / And I want you to walk down freedom’s road. The betrayal of that hope is an affront to the vision of human freedom and justice to which all our religious traditions aspire.

I serve as Dean of Washington National Cathedral, and because we are both a faith community and a place where religion and public life naturally come together, I addressed our response to Michael Brown’s death and the subsequent unrest during last Sunday morning’s services. I said, in part,

This morning I do want to say, speaking for myself and I believe for the cathedral, that given this nation’s history of racial injustice, the issues and concerns in Ferguson really ought to be at the top of our prayer list and action agenda as a faith community.

We here at the cathedral are quick to point people to the Canterbury Pulpit and remind them that Martin Luther King, Jr., gave his final Sunday sermon here. We’re quick to appeal to Dr. King’s legacy and to claim a piece of it for ourselves. If we’re really serious about claiming that legacy, it seems to me, we will not only pray for peace in Ferguson, but we’ll also pray for justice. And so, as we go forward as a nation, I add my voice to the many faith leaders who are saying, “Yes, we appeal for peace, we appeal for calm, we appeal for healing in Ferguson, but we also appeal for answers” — so that the killing of Michael Brown and its aftermath will not be just forgotten in the next sweep of events, but will call us all into facing continually into God’s invitation to us to break down human boundaries and to ensure that all people find life safe, meaningful, and abundant.

So on behalf of the Cathedral and on behalf of all who serve and worship here, I call everyone to prayer and action for not only the people of Ferguson, but for our nation as we continue to live into trying to understand what these events mean, and we pray that justice will be done and that peace will prevail.

For the faith community, Michael Brown’s life and death matter. For the faith community, addressing the social, political, and racial dynamics of his death matter, too. The “post-racial America” which so many announced still has yet to arrive. If we are going to live in the America that really exists, we need to face into the racial history that is ours and in which our churches have had such a complicated role. Michael Brown’s killing reminds us, if of nothing else, that the hopes of “Brown Baby” have yet to be realized:

When out of men’s heart all hate is hurled

Sweetie you gonna live in a better world

Our churches, synagogues, mosques, and temples need to be about the work of helping God bring that better world into being.

 

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  • Martin Hughes

    What steps towards justice do you have in mind?

  • nwcolorist

    Michael Brown’s death was certainly a tragedy, as is the violent death of any of God’s children, of whatever race, color, or creed. However, before printing his eulogy, shouldn’t we strive to understand the full context of what happened that terrible night? And that means, as difficult as it may be, patiently waiting for all the facts to come in.

    • markpkessinger

      It is a myth that an arrest cannot be made “before all the facts are in.” In truth, very rarely are “all the facts in” whenever any arrest on a ;criminal charge. Think about it: if indeed, in a criminal case, all the facts were known, why would we bother with a trial? There is enough information available to charge the officer who shot Mr. Brown. The rest should be up to a jury to sort out.

      • Sunny Child

        Is that “enough information available” referred to, the one that is being reported by the (often wrong) media? Who are the judges of this “enough”? Are we people at large to become judges? Would that help or hurt the cause of justice and love and respect for all?

  • corgimel

    Have we heard anything from the media about the injuries the officer received?

    • Martin Hughes

      One of the facts about facts is that they’re hard to agree.

  • Sunny Child

    Indeed any violent death is a great tragedy. Christian teaching certainly is at odds with violence, dishonesty or any violation of the 10 commandments and with not loving our fellow children of God (our neighbors) as ourselves. The word of God in Christian faith counsels being merciful, slow to anger, and warns repeatedly against judging hastily. For all this, it is surprising that a truthful Christian man would write a eulogy CONDEMNING a child of God BEFORE even human justice has gathered the facts to pronounce itself.

  • Kay Peters

    Thank you to all those who are supporting that we get all the information about the event before we make judgement either way.

  • HildyJJ

    Christianity continues to cherry pick the bible for its moral lessons. One could just as easily cite the law of Yahweh that disobedient children should be stoned to death. And is Michael Brown’s killing because he didn’t stop and turn around any less reprehensible than the killing of Lot’s wife because she did?

    Someday enlightened christians will admit that the message of Jesus is that Yahweh was wrong. That too much of the bible is filled with the immoral hatred spread by a jealous god. Thomas Jefferson was right. The life and morals of Jesus are worthy of study and emulation but the OT should be held no more sacred than the writings of Homer.

    Too much hatred, based on religion, race, and gender, can be justified with the OT. Contrast Jesus with his well known parable of the Good Samaritan with Yahweh’s less known condemnation of them in Hosea 13:16 “They will fall by the sword; their little ones will be dashed to the ground, their pregnant women ripped open.

    If you wish to temper the condemnation of Yahweh, say that he recognized his error and sent Jesus to teach people that he had been wrong. But stand up and admit that he was wrong.

  • HildyJJ

    Christianity continues to cherry pick the bible for its moral lessons. One could just as easily cite the law of Yahweh that disobedient children should be stoned to death. And is Michael Brown’s killing because he didn’t stop and turn around any less reprehensible than the killing of Lot’s wife because she did?

    Someday enlightened christians will admit that the message of Jesus is that Yahweh was wrong. That too much of the bible is filled with the immoral hatred spread by a jealous god. Thomas Jefferson was right. The life and morals of Jesus are worthy of study and emulation but the OT should be held no more sacred than the writings of Homer.

    Too much hatred, based on religion, race, and gender, can be justified with the OT. Contrast Jesus with his well known parable of the Good Samaritan with Yahweh’s less known condemnation of them in Hosea 13:16 “They will fall by the sword; their little ones will be dashed to the ground, their pregnant women ripped open.

    If you wish to temper the condemnation of Yahweh, say that he recognized his error and sent Jesus to teach people that he had been wrong. But stand up and admit that he was wrong.

    • Sunny Child

      I have heard it say and I agree that the Bible is a sort of textbook on all types of thought and their consequences (what happens, what we bring to ourselves when we are dishonest, hateful, violent, unloving, etc., that is, when we oppose spiritual law.) Obviously the Bible bears a relationship with the degree of spiritual development of the people of the time. So there is a lot of violent type of thought exemplified in it (“God will punish” is to say “Your breaking spiritual law will punish you”). However, in taking the time to read through the OT and underline all that is loving and forgiving, one is surprised of all the good counsel found there too (ex. Malachi 2:10). Now, of course as most know, Jesus Christ came to bring the good news of the new covenant and that is because the first covenant had been faulty–or no longer appropriate–, as the people had evolved enough in their sense of right and wrong (ref. Heb 8:7). We humans very much like having free will, yet we don’t want to accept the responsibility that comes along with it– and so we are quick to accuse God of being wrong, before considering that it is more likely that God’s first covenant and OT was adapting to our very primitive (and wrong-headed) understanding and acceptance of Love and Good and all that derives, such as ethics, morals, respect of our neighbor, etc.

  • George

    I find there is a disturbing bias in this presentation that has been made before all the facts are in.