More Mormons On a Mission

Some 80,000 Mormon missionaries are now serving worldwide — a rise of 22,000 in the past year, half of them young women.

On the same weekend that it was announced that the number of Mormons worldwide has passed the 15 million mark, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints passed another milestone.

Church President Thomas S. Monson announced at the faith’s 183rd semi-annual conference in Salt Lake City this past weekend that 80,000 missionaries are now serving worldwide – a staggering rise of 22,000 in the past year, half of them young women.

Perhaps no aspect of the church has been more visible or enduring than that of the ubiquitous, mostly male Mormon missionary, instantly recognizable on the streets of any city in the world with white shirt, tie, scriptures in tow and usually a smile to boot. And perhaps nothing in recent church history promises to have such a weighty long-term effect on the church that sends them into the world than this unprecedented surge in its missionary force.

It was just one year ago when President Monson announced a lowering of the qualifying minimum age for missionaries worldwide that became the trigger for thousands of young people to recalibrate their lives.  For men, the age dropped from 19 to 18. For women, it would now be 19, not 21.

In the 21,000-seat Conference Center flanking Temple Square in Salt Lake City, the audience reacted visibly to the announcement.  Young men approaching the end of high school who had planned on a year of college or a temporary job before missionary service suddenly had the option to go early. Many young women of the same age who had vaguely kept open the option of missionary service “maybe-if-nothing-else-is-happening-in-my life” began reaching for their cell phones to text their local bishop for appointments. Many wept for the sudden possibilities; others beamed. Over the next few days, thousands of them went to those appointments to begin the application process.

One year later, the numbers are telling.  Female missionaries serving: up by 140 percent.  Male missionaries: up by 21 percent. Even senior, retired couples are volunteering in greater numbers – eight percent higher than a year ago.

Although the church confidently expected an increase, no one could be certain of the numbers or the impact the change would have.  Twenty-two thousand more missionaries mean colleges having to deal with unexpected drops in enrolment, at least for now. Missionary training centers around the world have reworked their schedules and missionary training time has been reduced by between one fourth and one third to accommodate greater numbers. A new training center has been opened in Mexico City where many missionaries called from the United States now learn their Spanish before traveling on to their assigned field of work.  All other training centers are now working at capacity. And in the 400-plus church missions around the world, new leadership councils have been formed with male and female missionaries, reflecting the changed composition of the missionary force.

To those unfamiliar with the faith – and especially those who embrace no faith at all – all this may seem rather strange. Why would 18 and 19-year-olds be willing to put their lives on hold for up to two years, at a time when their peers are working through college or starting careers?

The answer is also the answer to what makes Mormons tick.  If not from the cradle then certainly from kindergarten Mormons are taught that the principles of the Gospel of Jesus Christ provide a framework for living, and that we ought to live the best lives we can based on that model. In particular, we give ourselves to God by serving others, and so service becomes an integral part of that pursuit for every faithful Latter-day Saint.

Service to others is so much more meaningful when it’s inconvenient. Anyone can write a check. It takes a lot more to surrender ourselves to the will of God, put our own lives and personal interests aside, and be willing to endure the rigors of a pretty Spartan life for two years.  When a young missionary sends in his or her application, it is a step into the unknown. They have no idea where in the world they will be sent. They have no clue as to the language they will be learning and speaking for the next couple of years, or with which missionary companion they will share a humble apartment. But they do understand something of the power of the gospel of Jesus Christ to change lives for the better, and so they offer their service unconditionally.

Within our global human family missionaries witness every conceivable kind of trial and circumstance. From opulence and selfishness to chronic, spirit-numbing poverty. From the effects of drugs and alcohol to the invidious addictions of pornography and gambling. From broken homes and battered wives to neglected children and debilitating illness. Missionaries encounter it all. But along with the bad, missionaries also see the redemptive power of the gospel of Jesus Christ as it transforms lives.

Through witnessing people change, missionaries draw motivation to serve even more faithfully, and in the process their own lives transform.  Those who experience this marrow-deep transformation return home stronger, more mature, more ready to bring their learned experience to their own families, congregations, communities, and even to the broader world.

Image courtesy of Andrew King.

Written by
  • Vanka

    The Mormon Church is a wealthy, money-making business, led by MBAs, Lawyers, and Public Relations professionals (seriously, look at their top 15 leaders).

    Their ultimate goal is to rule the world. Seriously, the knee mark on Mormon underwear reminds Mormons “that every knee shall bow and every tongue confess that (the Mormon) Jesus is the Christ” – alluding to Mormon Dominionism: the belief that the Mormon Church will soon be the one and only POLITICAL authority on the earth!

    The LDS Bible Dictionary explains:

    “The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the kingdom of God on the earth, but is at the present limited to an ecclesiastical kingdom. During the millennial era, the kingdom of God will be both political and ecclesiastical (see Dan. 7:18, 22, 27; Rev. 11:15; JST Rev. 12:13, 7; D&C 65), and will have worldwide jurisdiction in political realms when the Lord has made a full end of all nations (D&C 87:6).”

    To achieve this, Mormons care about nothing so much as money and power. The Church’s “secret combinations” to lobby and manipulate legislation in Hawaii and California against gays and same sex marriage backfired and gave them a PR black eye. Since then, members are leaving in droves and they have had to radically increase their sales force (missionaries) to replace the mass exodus. People leaving means money (tithing) leaving, and without money, the Church cannot buy favors, press, publicity, and powerful positions in governments, corporation boards, media, and academia. So the Church’s expensive Public Relations firm has researched it (through Dan Jones) and recommended to leaders to back off and soften up on the gay hating – it doesn’t sell!

    Mormon leaders are predictable. They will change policy and have “revelations” from their prosperity gospel god in whatever way increases revenues and positions their elite Church families in powerful circles.

    This is a dangerous cult. Mark it down.

  • Vanka

    The Mormon Church is a wealthy, money-making business, led by MBAs, Lawyers, and Public Relations professionals (seriously, look at their top 15 leaders).

    Their ultimate goal is to rule the world. Seriously, the knee mark on Mormon underwear reminds Mormons “that every knee shall bow and every tongue confess that (the Mormon) Jesus is the Christ” – alluding to Mormon Dominionism: the belief that the Mormon Church will soon be the one and only POLITICAL authority on the earth!

    The LDS Bible Dictionary explains:

    “The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the kingdom of God on the earth, but is at the present limited to an ecclesiastical kingdom. During the millennial era, the kingdom of God will be both political and ecclesiastical (see Dan. 7:18, 22, 27; Rev. 11:15; JST Rev. 12:13, 7; D&C 65), and will have worldwide jurisdiction in political realms when the Lord has made a full end of all nations (D&C 87:6).”

    To achieve this, Mormons care about nothing so much as money and power. The Church’s “secret combinations” to lobby and manipulate legislation in Hawaii and California against gays and same sex marriage backfired and gave them a PR black eye. Since then, members are leaving in droves and they have had to radically increase their sales force (missionaries) to replace the mass exodus. People leaving means money (tithing) leaving, and without money, the Church cannot buy favors, press, publicity, and powerful positions in governments, corporation boards, media, and academia. So the Church’s expensive Public Relations firm has researched it (through Dan Jones) and recommended to leaders to back off and soften up on the gay hating – it doesn’t sell!

    Mormon leaders are predictable. They will change policy and have “revelations” from their prosperity gospel god in whatever way increases revenues and positions their elite Church families in powerful circles.

    This is a dangerous cult. Mark it down.

  • poulser

    I was a Mormon missionary in Brazil for two years a little over a decade ago. I loved it. I learned a lot about myself and experienced a different culture. I had my eyes opened to a new worldview outside of my small-town Utah upbringing. I felt a great sense of satisfaction in helping others full-time for two years.
    Since I’ve come home, I’ve looked critically into the church, its leadership, its political involvements, its history and its convoluted doctrines and can’t help but think that it’s a massive fraud. Even still I look back fondly at my time abroad.

  • poulser

    I was a Mormon missionary in Brazil for two years a little over a decade ago. I loved it. I learned a lot about myself and experienced a different culture. I had my eyes opened to a new worldview outside of my small-town Utah upbringing. I felt a great sense of satisfaction in helping others full-time for two years.
    Since I’ve come home, I’ve looked critically into the church, its leadership, its political involvements, its history and its convoluted doctrines and can’t help but think that it’s a massive fraud. Even still I look back fondly at my time abroad.

  • Sean B

    Here’s what I know. I’m raising a family based on principles taught in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This includes love (most of all), service, sacrifice, forgiveness, honesty, work, faith, education, patience, etc. To the extent that we live up to these principles and ideals in our home, peace and joy reign.

    My ambition for such a family came while I was serving a mission in Kentucky and I learned the same pattern in my own life – to the extent that I learn and follow the teachings of the Lord Jesus Christ, I find joy, peace, and fulfillment.

    That is my experience, then and now. Some may charge me with an unsophisticated or naive understanding. I simply ask, do good principles that lead to joy, peace, and fulfillment need to be convoluted? Does complication enhance joy?

  • Sean B

    Here’s what I know. I’m raising a family based on principles taught in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This includes love (most of all), service, sacrifice, forgiveness, honesty, work, faith, education, patience, etc. To the extent that we live up to these principles and ideals in our home, peace and joy reign.

    My ambition for such a family came while I was serving a mission in Kentucky and I learned the same pattern in my own life – to the extent that I learn and follow the teachings of the Lord Jesus Christ, I find joy, peace, and fulfillment.

    That is my experience, then and now. Some may charge me with an unsophisticated or naive understanding. I simply ask, do good principles that lead to joy, peace, and fulfillment need to be convoluted? Does complication enhance joy?

  • rainfog

    Good article. It’s nice to see that a Church is so involved in spreading the gospel of Jesus Christ. Christ Himself set up His church in the ancient days to be a missionary church, and He often stated that people should love and serve each other. The LDS Church is doing that more than any other Church on this earth that I can tell. That stands as an undeniable truth regardless of the anti-LDS comments here. And the LDS people are for the most part, more spiritually inclined, more family oriented and more wholesome-living than people at large. Actions speak louder than words. Congrats to the LDS people on having a good thing, and shame on those who just want to spout their own unhappy negativity.

  • rainfog

    Good article. It’s nice to see that a Church is so involved in spreading the gospel of Jesus Christ. Christ Himself set up His church in the ancient days to be a missionary church, and He often stated that people should love and serve each other. The LDS Church is doing that more than any other Church on this earth that I can tell. That stands as an undeniable truth regardless of the anti-LDS comments here. And the LDS people are for the most part, more spiritually inclined, more family oriented and more wholesome-living than people at large. Actions speak louder than words. Congrats to the LDS people on having a good thing, and shame on those who just want to spout their own unhappy negativity.

  • ltbugaf

    Your effort to twist these common Christian teachings into something sinister about Mormons is more than a bit pathetic. If anyone thinks the belief that someday every knee shall bow and every tongue confess Jesus as the Christ (your interpolation of “the Mormon” before Jesus is meaningless and misleading) needs to have a look at the Bible, including Romans 14:11, Philippians 2:10, and Isaiah 45:23. The Mormon teaching that this will happen someday is simply referring the return of Jesus to the Earth to rule as its King. Surely, you’re not pretending that Mormons are somehow unique among Christians in that belief.

  • ltbugaf

    Your effort to twist these common Christian teachings into something sinister about Mormons is more than a bit pathetic. If anyone thinks the belief that someday every knee shall bow and every tongue confess Jesus as the Christ (your interpolation of “the Mormon” before Jesus is meaningless and misleading) needs to have a look at the Bible, including Romans 14:11, Philippians 2:10, and Isaiah 45:23. The Mormon teaching that this will happen someday is simply referring the return of Jesus to the Earth to rule as its King. Surely, you’re not pretending that Mormons are somehow unique among Christians in that belief.

  • Iraja

    “The Mormon Church is a wealthy, money-making business, led by MBAs, Lawyers, and Public Relations professionals (seriously, look at Their top 15 leaders).”

    One question: Where is all this money going that you mention? Where the Church is putting all this money?

    The top leaders you mention, they all have a frugal life, devoid of luxury and ostentation. Are retired people and devote the rest of their lives to serve in the Church, which is a very simple thing to check out.

    The Church does not pay salary to the clergy. Only those who provide professional services.

    I think you should inform yourself better before declaring that someone is enriching.

  • ltbugaf

    One of my sentences got garbled. It should read, “If anyone thinks the belief that someday every knee shall bow and every tongue confess Jesus as the Christ (your interpolation of “the Mormon” before Jesus is meaningless and misleading) is a uniquely Mormon belief, then that person needs to have a look at the Bible, including Romans 14:11, Philippians 2:10 and Isaiah 45:23.”

    These beliefs are common throughout Christendom and there’s nothing of world-dominating ambition in them. Mormons simply join with other worshippers of Jesus in the belief that He will return someday to the Earth and reign as its King. We hope to be bowing right along with everyone else.

  • Iraja

    “The Mormon Church is a wealthy, money-making business, led by MBAs, Lawyers, and Public Relations professionals (seriously, look at Their top 15 leaders).”

    One question: Where is all this money going that you mention? Where the Church is putting all this money?

    The top leaders you mention, they all have a frugal life, devoid of luxury and ostentation. Are retired people and devote the rest of their lives to serve in the Church, which is a very simple thing to check out.

    The Church does not pay salary to the clergy. Only those who provide professional services.

    I think you should inform yourself better before declaring that someone is enriching.

  • ltbugaf

    One of my sentences got garbled. It should read, “If anyone thinks the belief that someday every knee shall bow and every tongue confess Jesus as the Christ (your interpolation of “the Mormon” before Jesus is meaningless and misleading) is a uniquely Mormon belief, then that person needs to have a look at the Bible, including Romans 14:11, Philippians 2:10 and Isaiah 45:23.”

    These beliefs are common throughout Christendom and there’s nothing of world-dominating ambition in them. Mormons simply join with other worshippers of Jesus in the belief that He will return someday to the Earth and reign as its King. We hope to be bowing right along with everyone else.

  • broham000

    For those who question or wonder, I reiterate the commonly used invitation in the New Testament gospels: “Come and see.”

  • broham000

    For those who question or wonder, I reiterate the commonly used invitation in the New Testament gospels: “Come and see.”

  • Tornogal

    I suppose seeing an audited accounting of LDS church membership is as (un)likely as seeing an audited financial report from the LDS church. No one gets to, even tithe-paying members. One can’t help but wonder why that’s so.

    Some reports say the LDS church counts members as members until they are 110 years old. Others say that even when people formally resign from the Mormon church they are kept in the headcount.

    I don’t know what’s true, but it’s clear the LDS church isn’t about transparency.

  • Tornogal

    I suppose seeing an audited accounting of LDS church membership is as (un)likely as seeing an audited financial report from the LDS church. No one gets to, even tithe-paying members. One can’t help but wonder why that’s so.

    Some reports say the LDS church counts members as members until they are 110 years old. Others say that even when people formally resign from the Mormon church they are kept in the headcount.

    I don’t know what’s true, but it’s clear the LDS church isn’t about transparency.

  • Dennis Lange

    There is no doctrine or teaching or belief in the Mormon Church about taking over the world and being the only political entity on the earth. We can’t even agree amongst ourselves on politics, for example look at Harry Reid and Mitt Romney, not to mention members of the church from other countries with a wide variety of political beliefs. We, as Mormons go into all the world preaching the good news of Jesus Christ so that all may have the opportunity to come unto Christ. There is no compulsion. We believe that this message will bless the lives of those that accept Christ, but we mantain good will and friendship to those that disagree.

  • Dennis Lange

    There is no doctrine or teaching or belief in the Mormon Church about taking over the world and being the only political entity on the earth. We can’t even agree amongst ourselves on politics, for example look at Harry Reid and Mitt Romney, not to mention members of the church from other countries with a wide variety of political beliefs. We, as Mormons go into all the world preaching the good news of Jesus Christ so that all may have the opportunity to come unto Christ. There is no compulsion. We believe that this message will bless the lives of those that accept Christ, but we mantain good will and friendship to those that disagree.

  • Dennis Lange

    We as Mormons do not believe in the “prosperity gospel” that may be taught in some churches. In the scriptures we are instructed to not seek after riches, but to seek after the kingdom of God.” We believe that if one is blessed with riches, then he or she has an obligation as a Christian to use those riches to bless the lives of the less fortunate, and in doing good.

  • Dennis Lange

    We as Mormons do not believe in the “prosperity gospel” that may be taught in some churches. In the scriptures we are instructed to not seek after riches, but to seek after the kingdom of God.” We believe that if one is blessed with riches, then he or she has an obligation as a Christian to use those riches to bless the lives of the less fortunate, and in doing good.

  • wdwrightii

    Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to every creature. Mark 16:15

  • wdwrightii

    Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to every creature. Mark 16:15

  • wdwrightii

    Did you vote for Barack Obama?

  • wdwrightii

    Did you vote for Barack Obama?

  • Tornogal

    OKayyyy….

    I Timothy 1:4 “nor to devote themselves to myths and endless genealogies, which promote speculations rather than the stewardship from God that is by faith.”

  • Tornogal

    OKayyyy….

    I Timothy 1:4 “nor to devote themselves to myths and endless genealogies, which promote speculations rather than the stewardship from God that is by faith.”

  • Vanka

    Please don’t. The world does not need nor want you.

  • Vanka

    Please don’t. The world does not need nor want you.

  • Vanka

    I call baloney on all you who have responded. I am married to a temple recommend holding Mormon woman, and I attend your meetings almost every Sunday. I have attended many Education Weeks at BYU. I know your Church and its doctrine better than 90% of active members. Your defensive arguments and explanations are so much posturing, distortion and lies. You are tainted (brainwashed) to be consummate salespeople, selling the glittery, warm fuzzy baloney but denying the reality of your totalitarian, Dominionist, prosperity gospel (Nephi: inasmuch as ye obey god’s commandments, ye shall prosper in the land) cult.

  • Vanka

    I call baloney on all you who have responded. I am married to a temple recommend holding Mormon woman, and I attend your meetings almost every Sunday. I have attended many Education Weeks at BYU. I know your Church and its doctrine better than 90% of active members. Your defensive arguments and explanations are so much posturing, distortion and lies. You are tainted (brainwashed) to be consummate salespeople, selling the glittery, warm fuzzy baloney but denying the reality of your totalitarian, Dominionist, prosperity gospel (Nephi: inasmuch as ye obey god’s commandments, ye shall prosper in the land) cult.

  • NateB1

    I was in El Salvador for 22 months. It was quite an adjustment to normal life, but I loved it. I was able to offer both spiritual and temporal service to people in need. I’m glad more missionaries are getting that opportunity now. I formed friendships that will last a lifetime with people from El Salvador, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras. I stay in touch with them as much as I can. It is inspiring to see someone’s life change. It was also sad and heartbreaking to see the drunk, Jose, slip back into his habit, lying passed out on the street. But, I still have hope for many people who struggled and I pray that they have turned their lives around. I’m so glad that many already have.

  • NateB1

    I was in El Salvador for 22 months. It was quite an adjustment to normal life, but I loved it. I was able to offer both spiritual and temporal service to people in need. I’m glad more missionaries are getting that opportunity now. I formed friendships that will last a lifetime with people from El Salvador, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras. I stay in touch with them as much as I can. It is inspiring to see someone’s life change. It was also sad and heartbreaking to see the drunk, Jose, slip back into his habit, lying passed out on the street. But, I still have hope for many people who struggled and I pray that they have turned their lives around. I’m so glad that many already have.

  • CCNL

    From the Land of Loading More Comments:

    Summarizing and being fair at the same time:

    Putting the kibosh on all religions in less than ten seconds: Priceless !!!

    • As far as one knows or can tell, there was no Abraham i.e. the foundations of Judaism, Christianity and Islam are non-existent.

    • As far as one knows or can tell, there was no Moses i.e. the pillars of Judaism, Christianity and Islam have no strength of purpose.

    • There was no Gabriel i.e. Islam fails as a religion. Christianity partially fails.

    • There was no Easter i.e. Christianity completely fails as a religion.

    • There was no Moroni i.e. Mormonism is nothing more than a business cult with missionaries simply being salesmen for their tithe-supported product lines.

    • Sacred/revered cows, monkey gods, castes, reincarnations and therefore Hinduism fails as a religion.

    • Fat Buddhas here, skinny Buddhas there, reincarnated/reborn Buddhas everywhere makes for a no on Buddhism.

    • A constant cycle of reincarnation until enlightenment is reached and belief that various beings (angels?, tinker bells? etc.) exist that we, as mortals, cannot comprehend makes for a no on Sikhism.

    Added details available upon written request.

    ·

  • CCNL

    From the Land of Loading More Comments:

    Summarizing and being fair at the same time:

    Putting the kibosh on all religions in less than ten seconds: Priceless !!!

    • As far as one knows or can tell, there was no Abraham i.e. the foundations of Judaism, Christianity and Islam are non-existent.

    • As far as one knows or can tell, there was no Moses i.e. the pillars of Judaism, Christianity and Islam have no strength of purpose.

    • There was no Gabriel i.e. Islam fails as a religion. Christianity partially fails.

    • There was no Easter i.e. Christianity completely fails as a religion.

    • There was no Moroni i.e. Mormonism is nothing more than a business cult with missionaries simply being salesmen for their tithe-supported product lines.

    • Sacred/revered cows, monkey gods, castes, reincarnations and therefore Hinduism fails as a religion.

    • Fat Buddhas here, skinny Buddhas there, reincarnated/reborn Buddhas everywhere makes for a no on Buddhism.

    • A constant cycle of reincarnation until enlightenment is reached and belief that various beings (angels?, tinker bells? etc.) exist that we, as mortals, cannot comprehend makes for a no on Sikhism.

    Added details available upon written request.

    ·

  • retrocon1

    Vanka claims to know so much about the LDS and its doctrine (better than 90% of active members). Yet admittedly there are active members who know more that he, yet remain active.

    Some scientists (and others) like to tell us how chimpanzees and humans “share over 98%” of our DNA. Yet that less than 2% difference amounts to a wide, wide gulf of separation in actual behavior, intelligence, development, and abilities. I would say that even if Vanka’s knowledge of the LDS Church is lacking in less that 2% compared to active knowledgeable members — that difference represents a wide, wide gulf of actual understanding.

  • retrocon1

    Vanka claims to know so much about the LDS and its doctrine (better than 90% of active members). Yet admittedly there are active members who know more that he, yet remain active.

    Some scientists (and others) like to tell us how chimpanzees and humans “share over 98%” of our DNA. Yet that less than 2% difference amounts to a wide, wide gulf of separation in actual behavior, intelligence, development, and abilities. I would say that even if Vanka’s knowledge of the LDS Church is lacking in less that 2% compared to active knowledgeable members — that difference represents a wide, wide gulf of actual understanding.

  • Scott M. Soulier

    This is the work of the Lord. He can do his work very well in spite of those who disagree.
    All are welcome to come unto Christ or reject Him.
    God will force no man to heaven.
    Come and see.

  • Scott M. Soulier

    This is the work of the Lord. He can do his work very well in spite of those who disagree.
    All are welcome to come unto Christ or reject Him.
    God will force no man to heaven.
    Come and see.

  • jasonred

    I had the wonderful blessing of serving as a Mormon missionary in Brazil. I loved my mission! It helped me draw closer to my Savior, Jesus Christ. It also increase my love for all of God’s children.

  • jasonred

    I had the wonderful blessing of serving as a Mormon missionary in Brazil. I loved my mission! It helped me draw closer to my Savior, Jesus Christ. It also increase my love for all of God’s children.

  • MMMCCM2011

    Vanka, why do you attend church services almost every Sunday? You are confusing.

  • MMMCCM2011

    Vanka, why do you attend church services almost every Sunday? You are confusing.

  • Happy in Utah

    https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.2.1/939W-XHY

    Here is some interesting info from the church

  • Happy in Utah

    https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.2.1/939W-XHY

    Here is some interesting info from the church

  • Cesarcris

    Why you don’t link the Abraham spouses or Jacob or any other? As far I know JS wasn’t the only prophet with more than one spouse.

  • Cesarcris

    Why you don’t link the Abraham spouses or Jacob or any other? As far I know JS wasn’t the only prophet with more than one spouse.

  • Tornogal

    How nice.

    I have a wonderful life. Amazingly successful career, awesome spouse, six successful kids, and sixteen precious and loving grandkids. I’m healthy, happy, well traveled.

    I never served a mission.

  • Tornogal

    How nice.

    I have a wonderful life. Amazingly successful career, awesome spouse, six successful kids, and sixteen precious and loving grandkids. I’m healthy, happy, well traveled.

    I never served a mission.

  • Pahoran

    It was nice to read such a positive article in the Washington Times about missionary service. As a member of the LDS Church and as someone who personally knows many Church members who are currently serving as full-time missionaries around the world, I encourage everyone to open their homes to the LDS missionaries in your neighborhood and to open your hearts to the message of the restored gospel of Jesus Christ that they are eager to share with you. May you find the joy and peace that can only come through the Lord, Jesus Christ.

  • Pahoran

    It was nice to read such a positive article in the Washington Times about missionary service. As a member of the LDS Church and as someone who personally knows many Church members who are currently serving as full-time missionaries around the world, I encourage everyone to open their homes to the LDS missionaries in your neighborhood and to open your hearts to the message of the restored gospel of Jesus Christ that they are eager to share with you. May you find the joy and peace that can only come through the Lord, Jesus Christ.

  • Vanka

    And don’t forget, open your wallets to one of the biggest religious cult scams around!

  • Vanka

    And don’t forget, open your wallets to one of the biggest religious cult scams around!

  • Vanka

    Prosperity gospel, eh?

    Sounds like Scientology… a cult!

  • Vanka

    Prosperity gospel, eh?

    Sounds like Scientology… a cult!

  • Vanka

    The zombies are called to attack!

  • Vanka

    The zombies are called to attack!

  • Vanka

    MMMCCM2011,

    My wife is Temple-recommend holding LDS.

    And yes, as a Mormon, you are presumed to be “confused” from the start.

  • Vanka

    MMMCCM2011,

    My wife is Temple-recommend holding LDS.

    And yes, as a Mormon, you are presumed to be “confused” from the start.