Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act: One baby step for humanity

Antiabortion activists march during the annual March for Life rally in Washington. The march coincides with Supreme Court’s landmark Roe … Continued


Antiabortion activists march during the annual March for Life rally in Washington. The march coincides with Supreme Court’s landmark Roe v. Wade decision, which legalized access to abortion.Mandel Ngan / AFP/Getty Images

In the wake of the gruesome revelations of the slaying of infants born alive after attempted abortions by Philadelphia abortionist Kermit Gosnell babies literally butchered to death the American consciousness has awoken to the reality of the heinous life-ending practice of abortion.

Now, in a significant victory for life, the House of Representatives has passed a bipartisan let us repeat that, bi-partisan bill to ban abortions after 20 weeks.

The “Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act,” introduced by Representative Trent Franks (AZ-8) and cosponsored by 184 members of the House, Republicans and Democrats alike, makes it illegal to commit an abortion after the 20th week of pregnancy. And just to clear up one of the fallacies that has been put forward by opponents of the bill, this legislation imposes a restriction on abortionists, not on the expectant mother. In fact, no expectant mother can be prosecuted for seeking or obtaining such a late-term abortion. The bill also contains exceptions for cases of rape, incest, or the life of the mother.

The premise of the bill is simple. Empirical scientific medical evidence now shows that unborn babies feel pain.

As explained in the congressional findings:

The congressional findings go on to note, “For the purposes of surgery on unborn children, fetal anesthesia is routinely administered and is associated with a decrease in stress hormones compared to their level when painful stimuli are applied without such anesthesia.”

In other words, by 20 weeks in utero, babies can feel pain. They feel the pain of an abortion. They feel the pain of the dismemberment of their limbs common in late-term abortions. They feel the same pain that the babies killed by Gosnell felt.

Gosnell’s public trial (eventually covered by the mainstream media) put the reality of the life-ending practice of abortion before the American people like never before. Gosnell was recently convicted of multiple counts of not only murdering newborn infants born alive but for performing numerous illegal late-term abortions. Pennsylvania is one of at least 41 states with late-term abortion bans. In fact, eight states have already banned abortions post 20 weeks.

The horrors of Gosnell have had a tremendous impact on the American psyche. The brutality of abortion has been brought to light. As we previously wrote:

This is precisely the question being grappled with by more and more Americans as they wrestle with the immorality and the tragedy of abortion, the taking of an innocent human life.

A recent poll shows that nearly two-thirds of the public opposes second-trimester abortions.

Congress listened. This bipartisan bill will prevent the unborn from experiencing the excruciating pain of abortion and having their lives cut far short of their potential, the ultimate assault on human rights and human dignity.

This bill is one small step for mankind. One baby step toward protecting the lives of all Americans. Putting aside partisan blinders, preventing the abortion of babies that feel the pain of having their lives ended is common sense.

People of all faiths, of all walks of life, can agree that we must protect in the ultimate right, the right to life. As Americans see how that right has been diabolically abused by those like Gosnell, as technical advances and advances in medicine continue to prove that an unborn baby is a human life, we are one step closer to protecting the lives of all Americans.

While the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act faces an uphill battle in pro-abortion Senator Harry Reid’s Senate, it deserves a vote. The unmistakable cry of posterity demands it.

Jordan Sekulow is executive director of the

American Center for Law and Justice

(ACLJ). Matthew Clark is an attorney at the ACLJ. Follow them on Twitter:

@JordanSekulow

and

@_MatthewClark

.

About

Jordan Sekulow and Matthew Clark Jordan Sekulow is executive director of the American Center for Law and Justice (ACLJ). Matthew Clark is an attorney at the ACLJ. Follow them on Twitter: @JordanSekulow and @_MatthewClark.
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