Stetzer: Christians ‘may be on the losing side of the culture war’

“We [Christians] must face the reality that we may be on the losing side of the culture war. [...] While … Continued

“We [Christians] must face the reality that we may be on the losing side of the culture war. [...] While this certainly does not mean we should stop legal or political efforts completely, it does mean that we should begin thinking about what it looks like to be the church in a ‘post-culture war’ era. We need to be prepared to defend the protection of religious liberty as we move into the future.”

Ed Stetzer, vice president of research and ministry development for LifeWay Christian Resources, on the election results and the future of Christians in politics.

Read more in the Faith 2012 Quote Archives.

EPA

U.S. flags wave at Rockefeller Center during the presidential election in New York on Nov. 7, 2012.

  • dave_oman

    There is a difference between religious liberty/religious freedom and religious domination. Domination is what the religious right has been seeking for decades, despite Jesus’ making the distinction to “render unto Caesar what is Caesar’s, and unto God what is God’s.” Our religion is between us and God, and we should want to keep it that way.

  • ThomasBaum

    Any “Christian” who wants to or tries to set up a theocracy in America or anywhere else on this planet does not have a clue what “Christianity” is.

  • Nick Bauer

    On the contrary, in the United States believers of all faiths benefit from their right to freely choose what they believe, and to generally live according to those beliefs. That freedom, enshrined in the constitution, requires that they also respect the rights of others, even those with whom they disagree. As an employer, a religious organization may exhort employees in regard to birth control, for example. It may not coerce or deny an employee’s right to freely choose. That is where we draw the line on individual liberty.
    We have recently endured and eruption of religious zealots insisting that their rights extend to controlling the behavior of others, and particularly claiming that their delicate moral sensibilities must be protected from the behavior of others.
    There is no such right. Not for them if my view offends them, nor for me if I find their view repugnant, offensive, or immoral -all of which I have found in the public behavior of religious groups in recent years.
    I hold my nose, and so must they hold theirs, if they would protect the freedoms we all cherish.
    They need not respect my beliefs, as very often I find nothing worthy of respect in the hate-filled preachings of certain bizarre “christianist” sects, but I continue to respect their right to their own beliefs. I insist that they respect my rights as well.

  • Nick Bauer

    On the contrary, in the United States believers of all faiths benefit from their right to freely choose what they believe, and to generally live according to those beliefs. That freedom, enshrined in the constitution, requires that they also respect the rights of others, even those with whom they disagree. As an employer, a religious organization may exhort employees in regard to birth control, for example. It may not coerce or deny an employee’s right to freely choose. That is where we draw the line on individual liberty.
    We have recently endured an eruption of religious zealots insisting that their rights extend to controlling the behavior of others, and particularly claiming that their delicate moral sensibilities must be protected from the behavior of others.
    There is no such right. Not for them if my view offends them, nor for me if I find their view repugnant, offensive, or immoral -all of which I have found in the public behavior of religious groups in recent years.
    I hold my nose, and so must they hold theirs, if they would protect the freedoms we all cherish.
    They need not respect my beliefs, as very often I find nothing worthy of respect in the hate-filled preachings of certain bizarre “christianist” sects, but I continue to respect their right to their own beliefs. I insist that they respect my rights as well.

  • Anonymous
  • Anonymous
  • Anonymous
  • Anonymous

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