Obama: ‘The United States has a profound respect for people of all faiths’

“The United States has a profound respect for people of all faiths. We stand for religious freedom. And we reject … Continued

“The United States has a profound respect for people of all faiths. We stand for religious freedom. And we reject the denigration of any religion – including Islam. Yet there is never any justification for violence. There is no religion that condones the targeting of innocent men and women.”

In his prerecorded weekly address released on Saturdays, President Obama comments on balancing religious freedom with condemnation of violence in the Muslim world.

Marvin Joseph

THE WASHINGTON POST

President Obama delivers an energizing speech to thousands at a grassroots event at the Summerfest Grounds at Henry Maier Festival Park in Milwaukee on Sept. 22, 2012.

  • Kafantaris

    The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution itself are both utopian, and both over 200 years old. But unlike other utopias, the one our forefathers embraced works.
    It has an ingenious mechanism to revitalize its institutions: Freedom of speech.
    As John Stuart Mill explained, when a society allows its citizens to question its government, its values and its most sacred beliefs, the examination finds errors and things for improvement.
    But even when no correction at all is needed, the challenge in itself works miracles — it forces us to defend them.
    If things prove fine after such “stress test,” we learn that we are on the right track. Merely knowing this wipes away uncertainty and replaces it with life and vigor.
    Such is the hidden benefit of open debate — and the reason why institutions elsewhere stagnate and die.
    And no one rushes to save them because people have forgotten long before why they are there in the first place. This is the grave danger John Mill warned us about.
    The fathers of this country gave heed to his words.
    Perhaps the fathers of new democracies should do the same.

  • Anonymous