Chick-fil-A president reiterates company’s stance against gay marriage

Tim Carman/The Washington Post The Chick-fil-A sandwich comes with a lot of sodium — and a side of marketing pitches. … Continued

Tim Carman/The Washington Post

The Chick-fil-A sandwich comes with a lot of sodium — and a side of marketing pitches.

“Guilty as charged” is how Chick-fil-A President Dan Cathy answered questions about his restaurant chain’s support of traditional marriage earlier this week.

That’s according to an interview published Monday in the Baptist Press, in which Cathy says his Atlanta-based company is “very much supporting of the family — the biblical definition of the family unit.”

Cathy also said on Ken Coleman’s radio show in June that people advocating for same-sex marriage are “inviting God’s judgment on our nation.”

“As it relates to society in general I think we’re inviting God’s judgment on our nation when we shake out fist at him and say, ‘We know better than you as to what constitutes a marriage,’” Cathy said. “And I pray God’s mercy on our generation that has such a prideful, arrogant attitude to think that we have the audacity to try to redefine what marriage is about.”

Cathy’s remarks are, not surprisingly, stirring up a controversy between conservative Christians and same-sex marriage supporters on Twitter that first began last year. (Search “Chick-fil-A” on Twitter to tune into the 140-character back-and-forth.)

The company first came under fire for its conservative stance on marriage in January of 2011 after news broke that an outlet in Pennsylvania sponsored a marriage seminar given by an openly anti-gay group.

Fallout from the ensuing controversy included a decision by students at Northeastern University in February to cancel plans to bring a Chick-fil-A to campus.

Further, a report published by gay rights advocacy group Equality Matters earlier this month says Chick-fil-A donated more than $3 million to Christian groups opposed to homosexuality between 2003 and 2009, and nearly $2 million more in 2010.

Cathy maintains that Chick-fil-A is not a Christian company, in spite of being founded on biblical principles.

“We know that it might not be popular with everyone, but thank the Lord, we live in a country where we can share our values and operate on biblical principles,” Cathy said.

Follow Gregory Thomas on Twitter: @gregrthomas

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