Why ‘I’m a Mormon’?

BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI AFP/GETTY IMAGES Ruth Williams hands out programs as she greets those arriving for a Sacrament Meeting of the … Continued

BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI

AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Ruth Williams hands out programs as she greets those arriving for a Sacrament Meeting of the Washington DC 3rd Ward at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints October 23, 2011 in Chevy Chase, Maryland.

There is a TV educational campaign running in a dozen cities across the United States called “I’m a Mormon,” and it’s creating a lot of buzz.

If you are unfamiliar with it, take a few seconds before you go any further to meet Mehrsa, Lorin, Sherryl, Erick or dozens more like them.

The first time I saw a Mormon-produced television spot was in the mid-1970s. Many will still remember it. The shot opens with the camera tight on a middle-aged man, buried in an armchair and absorbed in his TV football. Outside the window behind him waits his son, baseball and mitt in hand. An off-camera voice asks:

“Remember last week when you said next week you’d spend more time with your kids?”

The man glances toward the camera with a half smile and a grunt of recollection. Pause.

Then the off-camera voice says simply: “It’s next week.”

These spots became very popular, and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints made dozens of them, winning a trophy room full of broadcasting awards in the process. The theme was family life, and they worked because they were real. Every parent could identify with the no-no things we all do when raising our kids and grandkids. The idea was to encourage the grown-ups in the family to do a little better at the most difficult task any of us will ever have – to steer our kids successfully into life by raising them in a home where love, values and boundaries are in the right proportions and expressed in the right way.

In the 1970s the Homefront series, as these spots were collectively known, got a lot of free airtime from station managers because of the quality of the production and the relevance of the message. After deregulation of the broadcast industry in the 1980s, the amount of free air time on offer dropped dramatically.

Deregulation and other factors prompted a fresh look by the Church at the best way to share its core messages. Many felt that The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints should be known for more than just happy families, important though that was. What of the deeper issues of faith that we were not explaining adequately, especially the centrality of our belief in Jesus Christ and how that belief impacted our lives? Over the next twenty years a variety of other approaches were tried with varying degrees of success. Some spots invited viewers to send for a free Book of Mormon or Bible. Others attempted to explain our beliefs specifically.

If there was a moment of birth for today’s popular “I’m a Mormon” campaign, it was early in 2009 when it became apparent from research that some more recent church-produced TV spots were not resonating with many viewers simply because they didn’t know a Mormon or had no way to connect with us. The biggest obstacle with these viewers was not doctrine or practice, but unfamiliarity.

The “I’m a Mormon” campaign is working today for the same reason the original Homefront spots worked thirty years ago. They are real. The concept behind the ads is refreshingly simple. A couple of video photographers and a producer show up at the members’ homes and look over their shoulders for a few days. To ensure that church members speak for themselves, their interactions are unscripted and the sole focus is to get at the story that runs through a person’s life, and the thread of faith that is part of it.

Neither do the short TV spots and the somewhat longer profiles or vignettes that are featured on Mormon.org shy away from the parts of life that are gritty and unglamorous. We see Jane Clayson Johnson formerly the elegant news anchor for ABC and CBS, contending with children’s messes and explaining that she considers her transition from high-profile journalist to full-time mother to be one of the wisest decisions of her life. We also see candid portraits of people facing truly painful challenges like the death of a child, infertility, postpartum depression and paralysis –problems that test the mettle of people the world over. These individuals tell us that they find strength in their religious faith that enables them to endure their trials and even find meaning and joy in their lives. Every video profile ends with, “And I’m a Mormon” because this is what being a Mormon or member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is at its core — living a faith-filled, yet highly pragmatic life in the real world. (In future TV spots and profiles, also expect to see the full name of the church).

Few of the people in these vignettes have recognizable names, but there are exceptions. Brandon Flowers, lead for the popular music group, “The Killers,” is one. As he has experienced it, a Latter-day Saint’s faith is a foundation, not something to be outgrown or discarded. It’s something he chooses to embrace even if it makes for an atypical rock musician.

Since the series was launched last year, traffic to Mormon.org, the Internet site for visitors, has tripled. Millions of people are being introduced to real Latter-day Saints for the first time. The Mormons in these spots are like people in your neighborhood or your circle of acquaintances. They are drawn from every walk of life, from different ethnicities and nationalities. They are loving members of families. Most are fathers and mothers, both adoptive and biological. Some are high school or college students with rocky pasts and big dreams. They may claim various political persuasions, and may not always agree with each other. They are people like you.

Which is the whole point. Latter-day Saints are normal in every respect except perhaps one. Studies show that they take their faith more seriously than most. Latter-day Saints who are active in their faith see it as a defining part of who they are and what they have become, not as an afterthought or number 10 on their list of inherited characteristics. Being a faithful Mormon is to live a life of commitment, marital fidelity, parental responsibility if blessed with children, honesty and health consciousness. It is to follow the teachings of Jesus Christ as best they can. It also means recognizing that most of the time we fall short of our own ideals and those that Jesus Christ set for us, but that through repentance and forgiveness we can start afresh and do better.

The Mormons in these spots all believe this in the deepest part of their soul. They don’t necessarily wear it on their sleeves. They may not push it down your throat. But if they say with conviction, “I’m a Mormon,” you can count on the fact that it’s more to them than just a label.


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  • sfcanative

    Active Mormons are 1/10 of 1% of the world’s 7 billion population, despite 180 years of aggressive missionary activity. They have a long ways to go before their sanitized message will resonate with humanity.

  • ccnl1

    From the Land of Loading More Comments:

    Obviously, Otterson is a victim of the infamous angel con:

    To wit:

    Joe Smith had his Moroni.

    “Latter-day Saints also believe that Michael the Archangel was Adam (the first man) when he was mortal, and Gabriel lived on the earth as Noah.”

    Jehovah Witnesses have their Jesus /Michael the archangel, the first angelic being created by God;

    Mohammed had his Gabriel (this “tin-kerbell” got around).

    Jesus and his family had Michael, Gabriel, and Satan, the latter being a modern day dem-on of the de-mented.

    The Abraham-Moses myths had their Angel of Death and other “no-namers” to do their dirty work or other assorted duties.

    Contemporary biblical and religious scholars have relegated these “pretty wingie thingies” to the myth pile. We should do the same to include deleting all references to them in our religious operating manuals. Doing this will eliminate the prophet/profit/prophecy status of these founders and put them where they belong as simple humans just like the rest of us.

  • MikeHickenbotham1

    14 million members is actually 2/10 of 1%. You’d better check your math sfcanative. The fact that we’re the 4th largest religion in America and are growing faster than most of the other Christian denominations worldwide ought to count for something. We think Daniel’s prophecy in Daniel 2:32-35, 41-45 applies to our growth. We have grown from 6 members in 1830 to 14 million in 181 years and are adding 1 million converts every 3 years now. While we do have a long way to go, we’ve got a pretty good start.

  • MikeHickenbotham1

    Actually ccnl1, we don’t believe in “pretty wingie thingies” but thanks for expressing your faithless, uninformed opinion.

  • MikeHickenbotham1

    14 million members is actually 2/10 of 1%. You’d better check your math sfcanative. The fact that we’re the 4th largest religion in America and are growing faster than most of the other Christian denominations worldwide ought to count for something. Daniel’s prophecy in Daniel 2:32-35, 41-45 seems to apply. We have grown from 6 members in 1830 to 14 million in 181 years and are adding 1 million converts every 3 years. While we do have a long way to go, we’ve got a pretty good start.

  • ccnl1

    Ooops, make that “pretty, golden, horn-blowing thingies” with said statues adorning the top of all Mormon temples.

  • Tyndale1

    I have never found a religion that resonates with my inner soul more than The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints does, a faith which is referred to here and in other places as The Mormons. I have finally found answers to my previously unanswerable questions, and found a way of life that brings me into full conformity with the life path of the most exemplary Christian, Jesus Christ himself. I love it all. I love this churches history. I love their teachings. I love that the heavens are again open and that prophets are again on the earth. I love their leadership in all things spiritual. I love how they care for others and provide a means for me to participate in lifting up the hands that hang down. I love how Jesus Christ again sent an angel from his throne above to re-establish the full and complete Church of Jesus Christ once again upon the earth in all of its purity and majesty and simplicity.

    I absolutely love the Bible. As a Mormon, I embrace the Bible fully and study its truths meticulously, cover to cover. It is a sacred record of Gods dealings with man on earth, especially in the Eastern Hemisphere. I am also grateful for The Book of Mormon, a second witness of Jesus Christ and the dealings of our Father in Heaven with His people on the Western Hemisphere. Both testify unflinchingly of the divinity of Jesus Christ. I love it. I love it. I love it all. Thank you for this article. May you each take the time to step inside our chapels, and to feel the feeling you get within those walls. Visit a temple open house and feel what is there. The Holy Spirit of God will warm you as you do. May the Lord ever guide you to all truth.

  • Vanka

    I have viewed a number of “I’m a Mormon” videos, and I have noticed something.

    Nowhere have a found one that represents (arguably) the most common answer to “Why I am a Mormon”:

    Imagine, if you will, a clean-cut young man, about 24 years old, dressed in a suit and tie, carrying a scripture “Quad”, walking to a local church building.

    He stops, turns to the camera (zooms in for a 3/4 shot), and says, “Hi, I am Timothy Typical. I was born and raised in the LDS Church. My parents required me to gather with the family every morning to read from the Book of Mormon. We prayed at every meal, and we met as a family for family prayer in the morning and again in the evening before bedtime.”

    “In each of these prayers, my parents asked God to help me get a testimony, and to learn to recognize the Spirit, so I would be prepared to go on a mission for the Church.”

    “I studied, and read, and prayed, and even fasted to gain a witness from the Spirit, but I never got one. Sure, I felt emotional when touching stories were recited at Church, and people were crying, but everyone at Church also acknowledged that emotionalism is not the same as the Spirit.”

    “So I went along with it. I love my parents and my family and my friends in the Church, and I knew if I didn’t pretend to have a testimony, and pretend to have felt the Spirit, they would all think I was unworthy – a sinner, maybe sneaking around behind their back smoking or drinking or something. Because I don’t want to be ostracized and treated like I am defective, I just pretend I have felt the Spirit and have a testimony of the Church and the Book of Mormon.”

    “I am Timothy Typical, and that is why I am a Mormon.”

    You don’t see videos like that on YouTube. But I guarantee you there are far more Mormons for whom THAT is the REAL reason why they are Mormon, than there are otherwise.

    In fact, worldwide, only about 1/3 of people who join the Mormon Church stay “active”. Only about 6/10 of children born to LDS families eventually get baptized at a

  • Vanka

    I object to the “I’m A Mormon” ads on the grounds that they are misleading and hypocritical. They portray supposedly “normal” Mormons, but these people are not “normal” Mormons. They are hand-picked or self-selected “active” Mormons. Worldwide, only around 1/3 Mormons are “active”, but you don’t see any YouTube videos or “I’m a Mormon” snippets from the 2/3rds of inactive Mormons!

    To be accurate representations of “normal” Mormons, the videos for MOST Mormons would be something like:

    “Hi, I am Jack. I don’t attend Church, do not pay tithing, do not have family home evening, family prayer or scripture study, and I think the Bishop is a pompous, arrogant, holier-than-thou fool. I tolerate a monthly visit from my ‘home teachers’, but quite honestly, they annoy me, too. I am financially better off than the active Mormons because I have 10% of my income MORE than they do. The only reason I don’t write a letter having my name removed from the Church records is because – who cares? Let them think they have a huge and growing Church! I don’t care. When I was active, it was only because my wife made a big deal out of it. The talks in sacrament meeting were painfully boring. The lessons in Sunday School/Gospel Doctrine were taught by amateurs who knew less about the topics than I did, and were always spouting off their own pet theories and nonsense. Everybody was trying to make comments that would impress everyone else with their righteousness or theological knowledge, but it always seemed to leave me wondering what the practical difference was. They taught repeatedly that women are supposed to be having babies and staying home taking care of them – to provide physical bodies for all of god’s spirit children – that ticked my wife off bad! She works because she finds her profession fulfilling, but because of that she is never called to be in a leadership position in the Relief Society. The homebodies they do call are inept, cackling gossip-mongers who use visiting teaching as a

  • MikeHickenbotham1

    Vanka,
    You have a right to your opinion but it appears you have had a bad experience with the LDS Church and just can’t seem to leave it alone like the fictional profile you just posted. You shared not one but two profiles (including the one below) with us that you thought were more typical of the average Mormon. But the purpose of these profiles is not to share why you’re a disaffected Mormon who is disappointed with the church you attend or don’t attend. These profiles are meant to show that Mormons are not the lock-step fanatics that anti-Mormons and critics portray them to be but instead to share why you love the LDS church and how it has influenced your life. Besides, none of us wants to read about losers who have chosen to whine about their sad situation. We want to read about people who have interesting lives and have found that their LDS upbringing helped them achieve their personal goals. We want to hear from people who have the courage to live their religion, contribute, and keep covenants they have made. You obviously aren’t that type of person. Maybe, instead of grumbling and criticizing the actions of others you could participate and make those boring meetings better. Have you ever thought of that? Maybe there’s a good reason why you’re not an active member and that you’re not sharing with us. Stop beating around the bush and tell us what your real problem is.

  • pmarlow

    (part 1 of 3)

    I, too, have had quite an experience with the Book of Mormon and the LDS Church.

    I was raised an atheist by my father, a staunchly communist (Stalinist) post-war immigrant from the Soviet Union. From my earliest memories, I loved my atheism. It allowed me the freedom to do whatever I wanted. I thought believers in God were fools, deluding themselves with false hopes in superstitions and fairy tales. I prided myself in my rational intellectual positions. Obviously, there was no God – or so I thought.

    But life wasn’t easy. You can’t just throw some seeds around and expect to harvest a bountiful crop. It takes a lot of self-discipline and hard work to make a life fulfilling and productive. I put such efforts into the arts and sciences, but as a child I saw no reason to practice any virtues anywhere else. As a result, I was reaping mostly weeds.

    While a young man living at college, I began to realize that I needed more. The path I was on was not leading me to the happiness I knew I should have. I explored other paths, but found nothing of practical value. My ways were all failing to produce any lasting or fulfilling happiness. Disappointment seemed to wait around every corner.

    I started to question all my beliefs. My atheism was the last thing to go. In a moment of complete humility, I finally recognized that I had no proof that God did not exist. I decided to experiment with belief in God, just to see what it would be like.

    As I approached this strange concept of believing, a question appeared in my mind. Would I be willing to do anything God would ask of me, follow and obey Him, and do His will in all things for the rest of my life, seeking nothing for myself? I humbly thought to myself that yes, I should and would trust God. I will do all that, holding nothing back, with no fear and no thought for myself.

    Suddenly, God revealed Himself to me in a way that is impossible to describe. It was equally impossible to misunderstand or misinterpret, more real than a

  • pmarlow

    (part 2 of 3)

    After this brief but unforgettable experience I fell to my knees to pray. I had never prayed before, but I felt like I needed to learn something more. And I wanted this wonderful experience to last forever. I poured out my soul to God, thanking Him for giving me an understanding of His greatness and His goodness, and asking that He continue to be with me always. But then the memories of all my sins, all the times I had scoffed at the faith of others, mocked them as weak and foolish, and every other wrong and selfish thing I had ever done, came flooding into my mind. I felt so unworthy. I couldn’t push the awful recollections of my past sins out of my mind. I was overcome by a terrible feeling of hopelessness, that because of my sins, I would be forever unable to enjoy the peace and love of which my infinitely wonderful God had just given me a little taste. I felt forever lost.

    A few moments later, God placed this exact thought in my mind: “Forgiveness of sin is possible through Jesus Christ.” I had never been in a church. I had never heard a sermon. I had never even touched a Bible. I didn’t know anything about Jesus Christ or a need for forgiveness. But as I then pleaded with God for this forgiveness in His name, all the agony of my sins was taken away. My peace, hope and joy all immediately returned in full.

    It was fully evident to me now that God is real and He has all the answers. I can trust and rely on Him. He would lead and I would joyfully follow. He led me to study the Bible. I loved reading of the wonderful works and teachings of Jesus. I loved how He organized a church, which led me to want to go out and join a church. And I was about to do that, but in the same manner that He taught me by His Spirit about Jesus Christ, He told me to not go out to any church. They were not all true. I should wait. He would bring the truth to me.

  • pmarlow

    (part 3 of 3)

    Just two weeks later, there was a knock on my door. Before I even opened it, God let me know that these were His messengers, here to bring me to His church. I didn’t know anything about their church – its name was new to me. I had never even seen a missionary before. I would later learn that this day was their first in my small Pennsylvania town.

    As these missionaries taught me about the Prophet Joseph Smith and the Book of Mormon, God’s Spirit testified to me of the truthfulness of their words. I read the Book of Mormon in 3 days and asked God if it was indeed true. By His Spirit, He confirmed the truthfulness of this book to me. I was baptized into the The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints a month later.

    Every day for the past 34 years I have felt God’s Spirit testify to me of His love and of the truthfulness of the many wonderful things I have learned in His church. The very practical teachings of the LDS Church have benefited me in many ways. Most importantly, they have given me a very real hope of eternal life through Jesus Christ. In addition, married now for over 31 years, I enjoy the great blessings of a happy family, something I could never have imagined as a child of divorce and a victim of abuse. The church has given me the tools to overcome every challenge and succeed in every area of my life.

    I believe in this religion. In fact, I know from God that it is true. All the research and rational thinking in the world cannot yield a knowledge more certain than that which comes from the Spirit of God. I have that knowledge. God lets me know continually that He lives and loves us all with an unimaginably great love. Jesus Christ lives. He is the Lord, our Savior and Redeemer. He alone paid the penalty for our sins. Only He makes salvation possible. I know the Bible and the Book of Mormon are true. I know that Joseph Smith was a true prophet of God. I know that The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is God’s true church, led by the

  • sfcanative

    Didn’t you get called away on a mission yet? This boilerplate testimony bearing is getting real old.

  • Pesley

    It sounds like somebody is really defensive about their crazy religion, huh? Yes, Mormons are normal in everyday aspects of their lives. They are just crazy when it comes to their absurd religion, just like every other organized religion.

  • Pesley

    I love stories about Winnie the Pooh. The difference between us seems to be that I know the difference between reality and fiction. LOL!

  • Pesley

    Mormonism is even more ridiculous than other Christian sects. Joseph Smith was a conman. Book of Abraham – research it! LOL!

  • antigen

    The only place that ‘I’m a Mormon’ is creating buzz is… at the desk of a Washington Post reporter. People are not gathering around the water cooler talking about the latest mormon PR campaign, sorry.

  • Tyndale1

    Well lets see. I came from a family of seven children. Six of us are totally active and one is not. I had five children. Four of them are completely active. My wife came from a family of seven. All are active in the LDS Church. Of our 35 Sibling cousins, 33 are totally active. Of my friends in the Church roughly 90% of their families are active Mormons. Those who are active are all extremely bright, industrious, hard working individuals. About 80% of our congregation is active. I am sorry if you never quite “got it”. I look forward to the day when the light finally goes on for you too. God bless.

  • arcombaticus

    hahaha “bright”

  • ThoughtfulDave

    This reads like one long advertisement for the LDS. There is no conversation here but a polished marketing slick including a link to a calculating produced profile of an authentic rockstar Mormon. What it doesn’t talk about is the pain this church cause their own children and their neighbors. They are virulently homophobic and expel their gay and lesbian children from their church and their sense of an ever lasting family and they put their money where their hate filled hearts are to the tun of 20 million dollars of funding to precent gay and lesbian people from marrying in California. So maybe Gay s and Lesbian make you uncomfortable as well and you somehow think that they wouldn’t be near the top fo the list of people Jesus would stand with not in opposition to then what do you think about the long time Mormon practice of converting Jews after death – including those kille din concentration camps – to Mormonism after death. I wish that this author had interviewed or presented the authentic story of excommunicated children – abandoned by their “family” for being born gay or the pain of the relatives of Jews who the Mormons claim they have converted after death. That is when I will know they are speaking the honest gospel.

  • StephenDD55

    Worth a look!

  • rob1099

    Mormanism is no more a cult then Christianity. Rememer that Christ to supposed to be a demigod with a mortal mother and devine father. This means Mary was impregnated by the Holy Spirit. Thats right out of Greco-roman paganism copying Hericles, Mithra (birthday December 25), Osirus, Achiles, Aniken Skywalker, and the list goes on. And what about God the father orderering the Isrealites to whipe out every Cananite man, woman and child. Can he really be believed in as the creator of the fabric of this amazing universe. Oh, and I forget; God insisted on animal blood sacrifices in his honor. Lets get real!

  • tbehrend

    Michael Otterson works as Head of Public Affairs at the Salt Lake headquarters of the Corporation of the First Presidency of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In other words, he is personally responsible as part of his high-paid professional position at the Corporation, for this latest ad-campaign. An honest writer, even an honest professional shill, would make sure that the words “advertisement” and “full disclosure” were somewhere on the page. Why would the Washington Times have the creator of this ad campaign appear incognito to “report” on his own video products and propaganda strategy?

    As a former member of the LDS church, a student of the Restoration Movement, and a great admirer of non-institutional Mormonism, I feel compelled to say that this indeed is what you get from the corporate church: misrepresentation of self and intentions, denial of history, partial truth deliberately represented as full.

    For any who feel there is probative value in the personal testimonies packaged and distributed in this online media push to polish Brand LDS, you might also want to have a look at non-corporate responses in an online “Hi, I’m an ex-Mormon” people’s campaign. And as a general advisory, don’t conflate LDS, Inc. with the world of warm-blooded, deeply human, highly diverse Mormons themselves.

  • tbehrend

    I am also advertising here — that i am an unreliable text editor. How could I have mistaken the Washington Post for the Washington Times? Rhetorical question, of course.

  • ccnl1

    From the Land of Loading More Comments:

    Obviously, Otterson is a victim of the infamous angel con:

    To wit:

    Joe Smith had his Moroni.

    “Latter-day Saints also believe that Michael the Archangel was Adam (the first man) when he was mortal, and Gabriel lived on the earth as Noah.”

    Jehovah Witnesses have their Jesus /Michael the archangel, the first angelic being created by God;

    Mohammed had his Gabriel (this “tin-kerbell” got around).

    Jesus and his family had Michael, Gabriel, and Satan, the latter being a modern day dem-on of the de-mented.

    The Abraham-Moses myths had their Angel of Death and other “no-namers” to do their dirty work or other assorted duties.

    Contemporary biblical and religious scholars have relegated these “pretty wingie or horn-blowing thingies” to the myth pile. We should do the same to include deleting all references to them in our religious operating manuals. Doing this will eliminate the prophet/profit/prophecy status of these founders and put them where they belong as simple humans just like the rest of us.

  • FredJ1

    Perhaps you were thinking of Rev. Moon – yet another matriculant of the North American School of Famous Profits.

  • Amberbe

    And how many Catholics, Christians, etc do you know that attend church ever Sunday? That pay 10% of their income to the church they identify with? Unfortunately, people are casual when it comes to worship. This isn’t unique to members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

  • captainmoronifromoccupythenet

    This comment epitomizes the dishonest nature of the LDS propaganda campaign. Otterson is the head of the LDS media department, however, he does not include this important fact while pretending to be an outside appraiser of the campaign.

    This campaign is misleading and obscures the real issues surrounding the LDS church. It hides the pain and oppression caused by a large corporation that hurts its members by promising them the world in exchange for their obeisance. In the end, the LDS promises are never fulfilled.

    We are Occupy the Net! And we are dedicated to countering the misleading propaganda of the church and showing that there is a much darker side behind the happy families on TV and the smiling “prophets” in General Conference.

    As former Mormons, we can testify that this is all an illusion.

    I declare this board occupied!

  • tapirrider

    Diane Sawer’s recent “Hidden America, Children of the Plains” showed no Mormons. Aren’t the American Indian in the United States supposed to be Book of Mormon people? I would have loved to see a child say “I am a Mormon” in Diane’s interviews.

    The LDS church locked the doors and shut down the meeting house on the Pine Ridge while spending 3 million dollars to build a new meetinghouse in Rapid City. The LDS women on the Pine Ridge cannot attend church.

    In the end, the LDS promises were not fulfilled.

  • vairua05

    Helllooo!!! Earth to space cadets….what are you all talking about? You have no idea what you’re saying….how can a martian know what an earthling is about until that martian goes down to earth and experiences earth life? Before you speak, attend one of our church meetings any Sunday either at 9am or 1pm. Then, write your comments with experience. Otherwise, don’t even bother….you lost me at bigotry!!!

  • tapirrider

    How must the women on the Pine Ridge feel who are LDS? Their meeting house was closed, locked up. They have no way to go to church. They are one of the poorest counties in the United States. Most people don’t even have cars and it is 50 miles one way to get to church (also in the poverty region). How does that make them feel, that a 3 million dollar meeting house was built in Rapid City for white mormons while they can’t even go to church anymore?

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Jesus, Bunnies, and Colored Eggs: An Explanation of Holy Week and Easter

So, Easter is a one-day celebration of Jesus rising from the dead and turning into a bunny, right? Not exactly.

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Dear Evangelicals, Please Reconsider Your Fight Against Gay Rights

A journalist and longtime observer of American religious culture offers some advice to his evangelical friends.

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The End of Surveillance for New York Muslims — For Now

How American Muslims modeled the right response to systematic injustice.

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From Passover to Easter: Why I’m Grateful to be Jewish, Christian, and Alive

Passover with friends. Easter with family. It’s almost enough to make you believe in God.