Muslims in America: Have you felt under suspicion?

Jahi Chikwendiu WASHINGTON POST Continuing our series of stories on Muslims in America, we turn our attention to the sometimes … Continued

Jahi Chikwendiu

WASHINGTON POST

Continuing our series of stories on Muslims in America, we turn our attention to the sometimes tense relationship between law enforcement and Muslims. Today’s story by Jerry Markon follows a FBI agent in the Boston field office as he reaches out to Muslims while also scrutinizing extremeists within the community. Last week, Michelle Boorstein wrote about Iqbal Unus, a U.S. Islamic leader who struggled to put post-9/11 raids behind him.

On Faith invited a group of Muslim readers to respond to Boorstein’s story by answering a few questions on faith and suspicion. Below is what two readers had to say. We will post more responses to On Faith as they come in. Share your story at the bottom of this post.

Thasin Sardar of East Lansing, MI wrote that he felt that Muslims were on the whole being treated fairly by law enforcement: “Despite all the talk about racial profiling or rather the call for it by certain segments, there is little evidence of it actually being practiced.” But he did cite a “sense of disappointment in the community” because “on the one end we are seeking to go out of the way to make everyone feel welcomed at our places of worship and on the other hand law enforcement wants to treat some in the community with suspicion.”

Patrick Lawrence of Ft. Washington , MD said he had never been personally the object of suspicion because of his faith:

On Faith invites Muslim readers to answer the questions about Islam and America below:

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  • divine0001

    Muslims are treated same as everyone else. There are whole bunch of people under suspicion in a community I know of, they are not muslims. They are mostly WASPS.

    However, I must mention that muslims who follow the teaching of sunni and koran must be viewed suspiciously.

  • divine0001

    Today, I read a news item about muslim community of New York went to celebrate Eid at a park with rides. Women with headscarf (and face completely exposed) were not allowed, not because the management was against scarfs or muslims, but because of the safety rule to prevent head gears from falling on the tracks which may cause accidents. The argument ensued, scuffle broke out.

    No sympathy for muslims. First, their religion that requires headscarf or hijab also requires women to cover their faces. Second, it requires women to stay home. Either of those choices could have been exercised. Instead, they decided to fight against the rules that were in place for years.

    Third, instead of creating ruckus, they could have opted to comply with the rule for the safety of hundreds. But they used the occasion to evoke sympathy, and cry foul. That must not be tolerated.

    I would suspect these people. If they think safety of fellow citizens is secondary to their muslim persona, then in my dictionary they are terrorists (for insisting on endangering the safety of others in name of religion). They must be under the watch.

    Rules and laws came first in USA before any muslims set a foot here. If they cannot stand the laws of the land, go back to where they came from. THEY WON’T.

  • nrnowlin

    In the Holy Bible, Jesus commanded all Christians to love their enemies and to do good to those people who despitefully use them. This is not ambiguous or contextually interpretable. Muslims, on the other hand, are commanded in the Koran to hate their enemies (Christians, Jews, and non-Muslims), and permits faithful Muslims to lie to their enemies, and to kill them if necessary. Abrogation, in the Koran according to Mohammed, makes this permissable and necessary. This why Muslims are under suspicion by non-Muslims. Fundamentalist Shiites and Sunnis read the Koran differently. Not so with the Bible.

  • rexsolomon

    What a lot of crock.

    All you have to do

    is go to an airport

    EVERYONE is under suspicion.

  • BetsyRossAMERICAN

    Patrick Lawrence has it right. I don’t want people to flaunt their religious beliefs. That goes for any religion. Worship however you wish but don’t expect anyone else to appreciate it when it becomes something we have to accommodate.

  • SCAtheist

    You must be reading a different Bible than I have. I guess you missed the OT where murder and ethnic cleansing were the norm.

  • SCAtheist

    Wasn’t there a poll last week where 17% of the Muslim respondents said they knew someone who is radicalized?

    That seems scarey high to me.

  • LarryG62

    Ask the muslims what ther religion teaches about dealing with unbelievers. Then publish the results.
    I dare you.

  • SouthernLady

    The peaceful religion…They get more rights than the Catholics. They can do anything they want. If the Catholics want to put a manger, all heck breaks loose. What a crazed nation this has become.

  • taroil

    All the hype about Muslims being descriminated is nothing but propaganda from a few who just want to show that they represent all muslims

  • caseypaul51

    I’m no fan of religion, but there’s a lot more to disregard from the Quran than there is from the Bible.

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