It’s Good Friday, even in Iowa

By David Waters The good and God-fearing citizens of Davenport, Iowa, can rest easy this Good Friday in the Year … Continued

By David Waters

The good and God-fearing citizens of Davenport, Iowa, can rest easy this Good Friday in the Year of Our Lord 2010. Local government officials are not — we repeat NOT — plotting to replace the traditional holiday heretofore known as Good Friday with the more generic and secular Spring Holiday.

Earlier this week, City Administrator Craig Malin confessed to reporters that an e-mail to that effect sent by his office was sent by mistake. “We’ve never officially changed anything,” Malin said.

Malin traced the maliciousness to last summer when the Davenport Civil Rights Commission suggested that the city consider calling the holiday something not associated with a religion. Malin said he forwarded that recommendation to his staff for review, but somehow, months later, the recommendation was resurrected as a fact in a widely distributed e-mail.

Chairman Tim Hart told reporters that the Civil Rights Commission recommended changing the name of the city holiday to avoid offending anyone. Many found themselves offended nonetheless.

In a word, it’s nuts,” Alderman Bill Edmond told the Des Moines Register, finding a way to turn a memo into a mountain. “Why should a small percentage of the population tell the majority of the population not to celebrate a holiday because it’s religious? Should I say I don’t like celebrating St. Patrick’s Day because I’m not Irish?”

Neither St. Patrick’s Day nor Green Beer Day are official city holidays in Davenport, and they are unlikely to become ones.

Davenport Mayor Bill Gluba said the naming or renaming of holidays will not be on the city’s agenda anytime soon. “We’ve just got more important things to deal with.”

Some church-state separatists might disagree with him, but not me. For the religious and the non-religious, any Friday holiday is a Good Friday.

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  • lepidopteryx

    “In a word, it’s nuts,” Alderman Bill Edmond told the Des Moines Register, finding a way to turn a memo into a mountain. “Why should a small percentage of the population tell the majority of the population not to celebrate a holiday because it’s religious? Should I say I don’t like celebrating St. Patrick’s Day because I’m not Irish?”

  • YEAL9

    For athiests, secularists and agnosics the Easter season to include Good Friday, like the spring season it graces, is associated with birth, renewal and fertility.For Chriatians, “the Easter season marks the Resurrection of Jesus three days after Good Friday. Sandwiched between the 40 preparatory days of Lenten penitence and the seven weeks of Eastertide, it is the most important and most joyous holiday on the Christian calendar.In 2010, Easter Sunday falls on April 4 for both the Western Church and the Eastern Church, a rare concurrence.”