Young Americans less religious by some key measures

By Michelle Boorstein More evidence that young Americans are reshaping the concept of affiliation and belonging: A survey released today … Continued

By Michelle Boorstein

More evidence that young Americans are reshaping the concept of affiliation and belonging:

A survey released today by the Pew Research Center’s Forum on Religion & Public Life shows that Americans 18-29 are by some measures — mostly those having to do with identifying with some institution or organization — much less religious than Generation Xers (like myself) or Baby Boomers, when we were their age. They are much less likely to affiliate with a particular faith, attend religious services or say “religion” is very important in their lives. In other ways, Millennials seem to be not so different — mainly in the areas of belief and practice, such as what they think about life and death, whether they pray every day, believe in God.

This is already shaping the way policymakers and politicians (not to mention marketers) think about and communicate with younger Americans. Is this more a question of style, though, or are they substantively different?

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