On Pizza and Jesus

Where does a pro-life, anti-war vegetarian with a boyfriend in the military fit in?

The headline reads: “Death row killer orders pizza for homeless as final meal.”

“Riverbend Maximum Security Institution will not deliver the pizza,” said Riverbend spokeswoman Dorinda Carter. ‘We can get some special things for the inmate but the taxpayers don’t really give us permission to donate to charity.’”

But apparently, the taxpayers give Riverbend Maximum Security Institution the permission to kill in their name. Stunning. Taxpayers give permission for their money to be spent on the execution of a man, but not on the feeding of a homeless person.

I said a prayer for Timothy McVeigh on the morning he was executed. According to media reports, McVeigh was stony to the end. He was indeed a murderer on a horrendously large scale. Yet as a Christian, I deplore his death as I deplore the death he inflicted upon others.

One of the reasons I identify myself is Catholic is because of the church’s consistent ethic on life. This means Catholics reject violence of any kind: war, executions, poverty, oppression, and yes, abortion.

Following Christ can lead you into some strange territory. I find myself torn among worlds. Where does a pro-life, anti-war vegetarian with a boyfriend in the military fit in? How do I follow The Way when the way is not clear? I strive for the answer to simply be to follow the bold, peaceful, compassionate example of Jesus. Yet every day, I fail.

God forbid I ever suffer the way the families of McVeigh’s victims suffered. But those family members of violence victims, like Patricia Quigley and Susan Retik, who rise above that torment inspire me.

“Let the wicked still act wickedly, and the filthy still be filthy. The righteous must still do right, and the holy still be holy.” (Revelation: 22:11).

And let the Christians still stand up for life.

 

Image courtesy of Der Vollstreker

Elizabeth Tenety
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  • Chris

    If they were going to pay for his last meal anyway, why not do this one tiny good deed? Surely, if his heart was repentant,God will have mercy on him.

  • Mani

    The taxpayers did give permission to kill in their name – they are the ones that supported the legislation and elected the officials. I was touched by the second half of your post – as a pro-life, anti-death penalty, liberal, vegan, practicing Catholic I can relate to how unclear the way can be. I am not one for quoting scripture – but I think that Revelations scripture is well worth committing to memory.

  • Charley House

    As a pro-life, omnivorous, anti-death penalty, anti-war, conservative I too can relate to the difficulty in living The Way. Thanks for your posts – they raise the kind of issues that help one stay on the path.CH

  • Jim

    Since when do “Catholics reject violence of any kind”? Catholic doctrine does not categorically reject war or the death penalty, and it was only in the 20th Century that it finally officially rejected all forms of slavery. It does categorically reject abortion, but its teaching on social justice includes the important principle of subsidiarity – a principle often overlooked in liberal circles.

  • Bobby

    The commandment is do not murder, not do not kill, justice is OK even the death penalty exacted by a court of law,as Christ said, hos kingdom is not of this earth but the kingdom of heaven

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