About Jon Meacham

I am fascinated by the ways in which faith — and its absence and its abuses — has shaped the world in which we live.

For as long as I can remember, I have been endlessly curious about the past — or, put more precisely, about how the things that are came to be the way they are. Southerners — I am from Tennessee — tend to be historically minded; as Faulkner noted long ago, the past is never dead; it isn’t even past. And so from an early age I have loved all kinds of history, including the history of religious faith.

I grew up in the Episcopal Church, went to religious schools (including an Episcopal Montessori, which is rather redundant when you think about it) and consider myself a believing, middle-of-the-road American Protestant. I go to church every week, and I read the Daily Office (those are ancient sets of prayers composed for morning and evening). But beyond my own religious views, I am fascinated by the ways in which faith — and its absence and its abuses — has shaped the world in which we live.

I believe strongly — totally — in religious liberty and freedom of conscience; I think Thomas Jefferson was brilliantly on the mark when he said this: “Our particular principles of religion are a subject of accountability to our God alone; I inquire after no man’s, and trouble none with mine; nor is it given to us in this life to know whether yours or mine, our friend’s or our foes, are exactly the right.” The best way forward through what George Eliot once called the “dim lights and tangled circumstance” of life is to talk and to listen, and to seek a culture in which people of sundry beliefs, or no belief at all, may live together peaceably and graciously. We have passions enough to stoke conflicts between people and between nations; the goal of “On Faith” and of our ongoing coverage of religion is to shed light rather than to generate heat, in the service of moving ahead toward what Churchill once called “the broad, sunlit uplands.”

About

Jon Meacham Jon Meacham is the author, most recently, of "Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power."
  • Kenneth Townsend

    First of all, I would like to thank you for your work on this important subject, Mr. Meacham. I too am a firm believer in freedom of conscience, particularly in matters concerning religion.In response to Mr. Krakow’s comment, I would like to make this observation: Religion is not always something that can be scrutinized in the same “objective” way as purchasing a new car can be. Some of the things that provide us meaning and shape our identity the most are not the products of our having actively exercised choice. I am not a disembodied, unencumbered self that simply is to choose which religion (or life philosophy) fits best with my conception of rationality. I am a grounded, embedded creature who loves his mother not because she is objectively the best, but because she is my mother. Similarly with faith: the love I have for my God cannot be explained simply by virtue of the fact that I have chosen it among a number of alternatives. I am a strong advocate of self-scrutiny — and in fact my family considers me a heretic for this questioning spirit — but the sort of radical choice, based on a universal conception of rationality, that Mr. Krakow proposes seems difficult to apply to matters of faith.

  • Alex

    I congratulate you and Ms. Quinn for establishing this site.Religious faith is a deeply personal matter. It is a pity that we are creating a climate here in the US which promotes the notion that our political and social lives must revolve around our Judeo-Christian origins.Our faith-based initiatives, especially those we are exporting overseas, unfortunatley reinforce the alleged legitimacy of the Islamicists to wage their Jihads in many parts of the world.We were a shining city on the hill which separated the church and state effectively. But, no longer so, especially during the last six years. I very much hope that it will change at least in 2008.Thinking with my head, I agree with Mr. Krakow that we should “ask whether any specific doctrines of any specific religion can withstand a strict logical scrutiny” and follow it only if it does.But then, my heart pulls me to conclude as Mr. Townsend does, ” I am a grounded, embedded creature who loves his mother not because she is objectively the best, but because she is my mother. Similarly with faith: the love I have for my God cannot be explained simply by virtue of the fact that I have chosen it among a number of alternatives.”I remain a Christian since I was born to Christian parents, and have felt no need to convert to any other faith. But, I also see no contradiction in my beliefs as a Christian which will prevent me from accepting that peoples of other faiths can also be in communion with God. I also believe that those who profess no faith in any religion can also be good and compassionate humanbeings.

  • Tomcat

    If you love God with all your heart, mind, body and soul, and you love your neighbors as ourselves, does this mean you will be saved? Presumably Hindus can also do that. I thought one had to have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ.

  • Thomas N. Tibbatts

    Well, I think that after reading Mr. Krakow’s intellectual comment’s above, all I want to say is that my faith in God that has come from growing seventy years on this earth, has come from my long experience in the United Methodist Church. The lesson that I’ve learned and need to continue to remember is that God is Love, and the two commandments that Jesus gives us,is to love God with all our heart,mind,body and soul, and to love our neighbors as ourselve. Is this easy?

  • Jeannie Carter

    Dear Mr. Meacham,Thank you so much for working with Ms. Quinn on this important subject. There is no more important subject to better understand to address world peace today. I’ll be watching and listening. Thank you!I wish you great blessings and powerful impact on the world’s conciousness about today’s religions and belief systems!

  • Rev. Dale Critchley

    Jon, I enjoyed the article on the Today Show and am happy to see this site, as well as the shift in our society toward discussing religion. I see this site being able to clear up so many of the misconceptions people have about different religions, and as a Lutheran (LCMS) pastor, I believe that the more we learn about what others believe, we’ll find ourselves asking, “What do I believe?” And provided we look to the right spot, which I believe to be the Bible, the better we will understand who we are not only in relationship to God, but to each other. I also believe that communication of beliefs is almost always a good thing. God bless you in your endeavor.

  • Rev. Dale Critchley

    Jon, I enjoyed the article on the Today Show and am happy to see this site, as well as the shift in our society toward discussing religion. I see this site being able to clear up so many of the misconceptions people have about different religions, and as a Lutheran (LCMS) pastor, I believe that the more we learn about what others believe, we’ll find ourselves asking, “What do I believe?” And provided we look to the right spot, which I believe to be the Bible, the better we will understand who we are not only in relationship to God, but to each other. I also believe that communication of beliefs is almost always a good thing. God bless you in your endeavor.

  • gene donaldson

    A good religious discussion is needed in this

  • Steve, from Texas

    This is good stuff and much needed. As a college student, I yearn for a time where people can, with the soberness that this subject deserves, come together and conversate like adults, instead of like warring nations and political adversaries.What we need in politics today is not a marriage of the two (religion and politics), but more authenticity and more understanding. To continue, I am not one who believes that religion should be disparate from the American polity and discussion, as every mention of faith in the political sphere–in my view–does not breach the wall of separation. Context matters, and the framers knew this.Religion and politics, when seen in America, seems to be so divisive, conflictual and hypocritical; an image that is unfortunate and shouldn’t be. Religion and faith should be about peace and amity, in the hope of despair, and not about tearing people a part in the face of political expediency and hope for political advantage. To some, religion and its tenets guides their politics and their understanding of how to go forward with their respective walks with Him. For me, my faith in God–to be true, it’s just that: my faith–guides me to be both socially conservative and an economic populist/progressive (and much the same tradition, somewhat, as the famous William Jennings Bryan). I am a strong proponent in: helping out those who can’t help themselves, Social Security, social justice, a minimum wage, equal opportunity (which doesn’t mean a guaranteed, successful outcome) and shared responsibility. However, I am also pro-life (with exceptions) and protecting generations unborn, anti-gay marriage (though, I can accept civil unions) and a believer in traditional family values. Some of you may disagree with me on all of those principles, but it is where I stand.However fixed our likes and dislikes may seem, we–all of us–must begin by accepting the fact that none of us has a monopoly on the truth, and that we must honor our similarities and respect our differences. Doesn’t last week’s elections, in anything, teach us that?We must be about listening, learning, respecting and, hopefully, growing in this process. This process must be, in the end, peaceful. With help from the words of President Kennedy, peace ought to work only “…by defining our goal more clearly, by making it seem more manageable and less remote, we can help all people to see it, to draw hope from it, and to move irresistibly towards it.”

  • Jim Blalock

    John,I remember your conversation during the 2004 Presidential campaign with Chris Matthews when you referenced Jonathan Edwards in your discussion. Chris responed by asking you, “Who is Jonathan Edwards?”When you answered it appeared that Chris had never heard of him.Please tell me that a man as high profile in news analysis as Chris Matthews knows the enormous, almost incomparable contribution that Edwards made to the direction of this nation.Here’s hoping that I misread what I saw two years ago.

  • AEM

    Great site, congratulations to the two of you.

  • Real

    You are the reason Newsweek has turned into trash. Subscriptions are down so I know I’m not alone. God told me not to buy Newsweek anymore. I’m sorry, God makes the rules. LOL

  • Steve, from Texas

    Real, from up above:I don’t believe this site was designed and published for people, as yourself, to espouse insults and harbor contempt.It’s an affront to what this process is all about, and completely unnecessary and unwarranted.This is, according to the what’s published above, “a conversation on religion,” and not a conversation on how “real” feels about how “trashy” Newsweek is.

  • Real

    I was kidding except for Newsweek being trash. I’ve noticed a steep decline in its useful content and arrangement. More entertainment news with poor layout and graphics are things contributing to my assessment.I like the idea of a forum for discussing people’s beliefs. I think it works in atheists favor. It brings people that normally would ignore atheists the opportunity to hear from them. Sam, Susan, and Daniel are all great speakers and will open up people’s eyes.

  • Ray

    Thank you Mr. Meacham, Your interest as a religious man and as an editor are much appreciated. Remember to include education in the conversation. It is not well known among many Westerners that Christianity was not always the religion of the West. It was adopted over time. It is often the case that many with College degrees have no formal training in religion let alone Christianity. There are only a few major religions of the world. That is religion that spands national boundaries. The many sects or variations within a religion are secondary points. It is important in this day to realize that religious beliefs most often do not trumph the rule of governments. The government is the only authorized (in the general sense) rule of force in nations. Religious sentiments of governments are political points of interest. They can be very legitimately derived from the culture but still political. Very few countries alow true religious freedom. That is an important backdrop to religious dialogue or conversations. Please include religous education in the context of the online questions. The spread of democracy should be applauded by all religions and with it the freedom of religion. THe less political force applied in the name of one religion by the government will do more to foster dialogue between the people of different relegions. The many religious conflicts are actually political power struggles. The founders of America – USA, were more interested in the freedom of religion in order to keep the government from the use of force over religion and religious people. We(our nation) is one of the greatest experiments of freedom of religion and interstingly one of the most religious people in the West. The more oportunity for this kind of governmental context in all nations will bring about less conflict, which is one of the goals of the religious dialogue. Thank you for your leadership.

  • Tonio

    Meacham has written elsewhere about the importance of religion in American public life, and how that often gets lost in the debates over separation of church and “state.” I put the word “state” in quotes because in my view, the correct word should be “government.” I suspect that many people assume that “state” refers to the country as a whole. The “separation” should be between government authority and various religious authorities, not between faith and public life. Government is not the same as public life. Government upholds the principle of religious freedom when it stays out of religious matters. So what would you suggest to preserve the importance of religion in public life without involving government?

  • pastor Isaac Ofosu-Darkwah

    Amen. Good Day Rev.

  • Suedmeyer

    Jon. let it never be said that “God Talk” is Dead!Am I wrong? Is not the thrust of the new colloum titled “On Faith”? Your book; American Gospel, was a wonderful start to this conversation. The concept of Faith is so different from the concept of Religion. Thanks for your contributions!

  • Ted Swart

    To Sally Quinn and Jon Meacham:I have tried in vain to reach you by email so I am resorting to a comment on both your panellist contributions. I think the whole notion of having a forum discussing the issue of faith in a frank and searching manner is a good one and many – though not all – of the panellists have risen to the occasion and many of the comments have been excellent. As I see it an enormous amount of commentary has already been generated and making any kind of sense out of it is a non-trivial exercise. Nevertheless it would be shame if the whole exercise simply sank away in to the sand. So I was wondering if the two of you were planning some sort of follow up exercise.For my part, the one thing which stands out like a sore thumb is the incompatibility between the worlds monotheistic religions — given their mutually exclusive claims. Atheists and agnostics take this as read but believers, in one or other of the monotheistic faiths, seem to be able – in some strange way — to avoid facing up to this. Anyway, I am sure that I am not alone in hoping the two of you will give the rest of us some idea as to what you have in mind once the forum closes down. Maybe if you did this some of the rather crude comments – of which there are fortunately not too many – might be less frequent. Try as I might I have been unable to find – on the website – any indication of how the threads will be pulled together.

  • Sara Shivers

    To Jon Meacham I thank God for this website. Having heard you speak on various news channels and reading your articles in Newsweek – I am so delighted you are now Managing Editor at Newsweek. I like the way you give special credit to your reporters.After reading American Gospel I had gone to my Methodist minister and to a member of our city government to speak to them about having you come to our city to speak. For the past few months I had been thinking how good it would be have you come and speak to people of all faiths in a citywide forum that would welcome all faiths and all denominations of Christianity. Protestants and Catholics alike have made Jesus a devisive force rather than a divine uniting of all people – a coming together in unity to love God and all others. When Jesus said, “I am the way and the truth and the life – no one comes to the Father but by Me,” I believe He meant no one comes to God but by the same Spirit that Jesus exibited while on earth – a Spirit of love and unconditional acceptance. I think Jesus would be very saddened at the devisiveness His name evokes. God says, “Those who seek me will find me.” Does that exclude anyone of any faith? For me, this understanding in no way denigrates Jesus, my Lord and my Saviour. Jon, would you come to our city? Perhaps other cities would also have you come to unite people of all faiths to understand and love each other as the CORE of all faiths UNDERSCORE.A personal note: At age 60 I returned to school and received an MA degree in Doctrine and Theology from Luther Seminary in St. Paul, MN and an MDiv degree from Duke University in Durham, NC

  • Stephen Borkowski

    I welcome religious dialogue as we are in a holy war which I call the War of Wahabbists against all of us Infidels. However , I have read a lot about people having a religion and a Faith but nothing specific about the religion subscribed to. Let me offer a suggestion along that vein: The Rand Corporation think tank under the lead of Angel Rabaso, published a 346 page report on Nov. 13 about Islamic terrorism. They say we are in an ideological war that can be won by attacking the Achilles heel of radical Islam.

  • Stephen Borkowski

    I welcome religious dialogue as we are in a holy war which I call the War of Wahabbists against all of us Infidels. However , I have read a lot about people having a religion and a Faith but nothing specific about the religion subscribed to. Let me offer a suggestion along that vein: The Rand Corporation think tank under the lead of Angel Rabaso, published a 346 page report on Nov. 13 about Islamic terrorism. They say we are in an ideological war that can be won by attacking the Achilles heel of radical Islam.

  • Jeff Reed

    I know of a person who has throughout their life, helped other people, given to the poor as they could, always respected others. Watched over children, volunteered to help the less fortunate when they could. Helped their children through school, their home, or college. Helped and watched out for neighbors. Respected all others.

  • Shirley

    This morning on C-span I watched Ms. Quinn speak about her beliefs. As a Christian we are taught that there is only one God. As I respect the beliefs of others, I cannot call myself a Christian if I believe that all religions come to the same God regardless of who their gods are. How can I believe that my God is made of stone and cannot speak, the Bible speaks of this reality and worshipping idols cannot be of the same Spirit as our Father in Heaven. Regardless of how much we try, we cannot bring Peace throughout the world. Only in our hearts and behavior can we try to live peacefully with our neighbors. It does begin with us, but Jesus warns us that in the last days many will fall away from the Faith that He taught us. Reading the book of Mathew in the Bible, regardless of how one believes will give much insight to what Christians believe. Thank you for this site as it has given me much insight into the thinking of others. I believe we should aways be informed so we can make the right decisions as to what is the Truth.

  • Lily MacLiam

    Jon, After hearing you speak at the PRSA conference, I question the motivation behind your interest in faith issues. You seemed to be mocking the President’s faith as you noted that he’s read through the Bible the whole way through…TWICE! Perhaps your snarky, disrespectful demeanor was an attempt to play to the liberal crowd. Congratulations, it worked! They loved you and increased their distate for the president–clearly your goal. As for me, I simply walked out.Please strive for a more appropriate tone in ON FAITH.

  • Bob Patrick

    Jon:Thank you for sharing that you read the Daily Office (morning and evening prayers of The Book of Common Prayer).I also read the Daily Office–although not near as often as I would like. I find reading the scriptures, singing the Psalms, and saying the prayers assigned for the day adds balance to my life like nothing else. This hour of contemplation is the greatest treasure to both a hectic day and a lonely day–bringing focus and direction for that day. This hour with God connects the spirit of God within my heart to my Creator and Lord.I have difficulty articulating to others the power of spirituality that some people are able to access. While I believe spirituality is separate from religion–and I have tried all my life to separate the two–those willing to share, tell me the benefits of spirituality for them come through some sort of religious ritual, such as scripture reading, spiritual study, prayer, journaling, worship, sermons, singing, or gathering with others from similar religious traditions. I would like to fly above the confines of religious boundaries and rituals, but I have discovered, like millions before me, these are the avenues I must travel to access the benefits of spirituality.Finally, spirituality gives power to people as they age, particularly those ages 65 and over. As they let go of material objects and desires–or these things are taken from their grasp by changes in roles, health, surroundings, and relationships—they tap into the mystery of spirituality that has been within them all their lives. Some find it sooner, like Paul of the Christian New Testament explaining a spiritual mystery as he tells King Agrippa of a voice speaking to him: “Saul, Saul, why are you persecuting me? It is hard for you, kicking like this against the goad” (Acts 26:14, The Jerusalem Bible). Some find it later in retirement, receiving care at home, or transitioning to an assisted living or skilled nursing facility. And some, if they experience spirituality, never speak of it. Jon, thank you, and Sally, for opening this avenue for conversation about a very important part of life.

  • George Bachmann

    Dear Mr. Meacham, Commendable effort, but since I found it dfficult to locate this discussion on your ‘Home Page’, I am beginning to wonder if the incessant ‘theistic’ babble precludes discussion of other religious approaches, i.e., atheistic or non-theistic. Faith, almost by definition, presupposes unverfiable assertions about something or other. The other alternatives of discussion seem to be based on ‘knowledge’ (in the gnostic sense) and suggest other ‘modes’ of knowing. And we all should know by now, for it is ancient, that knowledge is the enemy of Faith. Instead of babbling on about the existence or nonexistence of some ‘Theos’, I would more rather hear about discussion of what one does. If the Beatitude is right (Only the pure at heart shall see God), well what does one do to see God, etc. Was it not St. Chrysostom who said that the only argument for religion is by example? Doing is not so easy as it sounds. In most spiritual approaches to religion, it involves getting rid of or allaying the power of one’s Ego (i.e., getting rid of greed, craving and the craving thereto) There seems to be some commonality among religions as to where to start. The basic one that I have found is developing the ability of Mental Concentration, almost to the point of being the Portal. If you gain absolute control Differences in Any particular religious are not particular importance here, whether you do the praying without ceasing method as suggested in “The Way of the Pilgrim” or Brother Lawrence’s, “Practice of the Recollection of God” For those who are not theistically inclined, such as Daoists or Buddhists, the Portal which is Mental Concentration, with single object (charged with or whithout content) such as focusing attention on your breathing (I believe that the Orthodox hesychasts follow this practice). At least anything gained by this is verifiable and might just invite the ‘Holy Guest’(spelling is correct) into your psyche, that goad which keeps one searching. If anyone has ever had an experience in playing music where the sense of the music and the conscious self are combined into something like a unity (Conceptual thought is totally inadequate here) Anyway, I would prefer to read what people Do or Practice than all this empty blathering about I pleas guilty and foregiveness for trying to express the inexpressible; perhaps its just that George Bachmann

  • George Bachmann

    Dear Mr. Meacham, Commendable effort, but since I found it dfficult to locate this discussion on your ‘Home Page’, I am beginning to wonder if the incessant ‘theistic’ babble precludes discussion of other religious approaches, i.e., atheistic or non-theistic. Faith, almost by definition, presupposes unverfiable assertions about something or other. The other alternatives of discussion seem to be based on ‘knowledge’ (in the gnostic sense) and suggest other ‘modes’ of knowing. And we all should know by now, for it is ancient, that knowledge is the enemy of Faith. Instead of babbling on about the existence or nonexistence of some ‘Theos’, I would more rather hear about discussion of what one does. If the Beatitude is right (Only the pure at heart shall see God), well what does one do to see God, etc. Was it not St. Chrysostom who said that the only argument for religion is by example? Doing is not so easy as it sounds. In most spiritual approaches to religion, it involves getting rid of or allaying the power of one’s Ego (i.e., getting rid of greed, craving and the craving thereto) There seems to be some commonality among religions as to where to start. The basic one that I have found is developing the ability of Mental Concentration, almost to the point of being the Portal. If you gain absolute control Differences in Any particular religious are not particular importance here, whether you do the praying without ceasing method as suggested in “The Way of the Pilgrim” or Brother Lawrence’s, “Practice of the Recollection of God” For those who are not theistically inclined, such as Daoists or Buddhists, the Portal which is Mental Concentration, with single object (charged with or whithout content) such as focusing attention on your breathing (I believe that the Orthodox hesychasts follow this practice). At least anything gained by this is verifiable and might just invite the ‘Holy Guest’(spelling is correct) into your psyche, that goad which keeps one searching. If anyone has ever had an experience in playing music where the sense of the music and the conscious self are combined into something like a unity (Conceptual thought is totally inadequate here) Anyway, I would prefer to read what people Do or Practice than all this empty blathering about I pleas guilty and foregiveness for trying to express the inexpressible; perhaps its just that George Bachmann

  • candide

    Jon Meacham is constantly pushing Christianity in everythings he writes. Pity that a very bright young man is misusing his talents in defense of a religon which has nothing to do with the real Jesus.

  • glamar

    Jon, Is there an email where we can suggest questions for this site. I know we don’t want to clog up the fourm with these suggestions.

  • jack birdwhistell

    Mr. Meacham, Thanks so much for all you have done to raise the level of discourse about religion. As a college professor, I have enjoyed the opportunity to refer students to this site and others where they can find civil discussion.Jack Birdwhistell

  • unmerited

    Mr. Meacham,I appreciated your recitation of what President Ford stated as well as your analysis of its Christian/Biblical implications (parable of the debtor having his debts forgiven, then rounding the corner and shaking a pauper for a few cents that are owed to him).I have written to you regarding the rearward-looking historical perspective that seems to peg our country’s beginnings at 1787 and call statesmen “Founders,” while failing to acknowledge or recognize the signers of the Mayflower Compact, Gov. John Winthrop, Roger Williams, Mistress Ann Hutchinson, William Bradford as Christian Founders. And the Virginia Colony was a joint stock company aimed at profit and it should be distinguished from the Bible Commonwealth known as the Massachusetts Bay Colony.But for Saul’s well articulated antithesis against Theism (all powerful,all-knowing, all-present God); the answer to his human suffering questions lie in the sufferings of Joseph (found in Genesis-he was reconned as dead by his father and was also blameless) and it lies in the Trinitarian God who became flesh and experienced suffering, pain, betrayal, death and who provides hope for today’s sufferers.

  • Brian Endsley

    Dear Jon Meacham,I would like to compliment you on your fine book, American Gospel. I better understand our country after reading it. As a relatively new nation, we have clearly benefited from the mistakes of others: the failure of older nations to strike a proper balance between religion and politics. In your bio, you mentioned that you follow the Daily Office, something about which I was ignorant. I recently got out my Book of Common Prayer and began engaging in the Daily Devotions for Individuals and Families. Brian Endsley

  • Jim Johnson

    Dear Mr. Meacham,

  • Jenna Jameson

    Jenna Jameson

  • Jenna Jameson

    Jenna Jameson

  • Willie Proulx Jr.

    Well LADIES and GENTLEMEN you did it—Your in my FAVORITES now. Finally a place to come a lay it DOWN, ALL “ON” LINE!!! THE CROSS that is! Many people have NEVER taken Christian Fellowship U.S.A. at ALL seriously enough—They haven’t realize that in our LITTLE MINISTRY (SHER & I) are trying to EDUCATE the GENERAL PUBLIC to the FACT that it takes much more FAITH to get BEYOND the CROSS than it did to COME TO IT. That’s an increase of FAITH that only JESUS CHRIST by his resurrection, fully recovered now from his wounds caused by his “COLLISION WITH DEATH” can now BREATHE INTO ALL “STALLED” SOULS!!! What is up with that—many of you might say TODAY? Please read it to understand for yourselves, where we’re coming from, in Great Poems of the WESTERN WORLD Page 32 Copyright 2006 but please excuse their editing flaws. (THE FAMILY NAME & YOUR INSTEAD OF YOU and Sherie’s first name is spelled with only one R.) Post Script: HIS NAME JESUS, IS TO BE REPEATED 3 TIME BEFORE EACH LINE TO GET THE FULL TRUMPETLIKE EFFECT OUT OF OUR PRAYER POEM AND SONG. One most important and final thing. In MY Biography, the “MESSAGE” talked about there was titled: “THY KINGDOM COME!” The inspiration came to me from a book titled: “MEN CALLED HIM MASTER” written by Elwyn Allen Smith which was published by The Westminster Press, Pa. Copyright 1948, by W. L. Jenkins, Chapter 4. Not through “WORDS” spoken directly to me as their editing of the Biography submitted by me—has suggested. Oh and by the way I hear many times people saying, “they are CHRISTIANS and what ever their POLITICAL CHOICE IS!” Sorry to BURST YOUR BUBBLE (no pun intended) but, maybe some of you people who have been conditioned to think like that, might see the “LIGHT” and become “FAITHFULLY FREE” not “WHOLEHEARTEDLY” foresaking YOUR “FIRST” CHOICE. For sure you’ll become less insecure while making much better “CHARACTER ASSESSMENTS” of those who’ll GOVERN us in AMERICA’S future no matter what their religious or political affilations, may be!(Romans 5:1-11 esp.3,4,5)

  • Viejita del oeste

    I am passionately interested in religious dialogue, but I find myself visiting “On Faith” less and less often as time goes on. No matter what the question or how well-informed the columnist, every discussion seems to — either immediately or eventually — degenerate into a series of poorly informed attacks on Islam and/or Catholicism. It also seems to me that in your attempt to present many different points of view, you end up running a lot of really superficial columnists and guest writers.

  • willy.. willy.. willy

    The post from Willie Proulx Jr.on February 6th was simply incomprehensible. Can anyone translate?

  • Willie Proulx Jr.

    OK Posted February 25th—Sorry I wasn’t able to respond earlier. We were attending my MOTHER’S CHRISTIAN funeral in FALL RIVER MASS. So what part of the POST is incomprehensible to you. You must be in the catagory of those people spoken about in Viejita’s POST. How could you possibly understand or comprehend ANYTHING being an INFIDEL, a non-believer. Some FAITHLESS LIFE people like you are still professing to live, today, in our FAST becoming SECULARIZED, by many people like you infiltrating “OUR” Created WORLD? Yesterday before attending my Mother’s actual funeral, and preparation for her Catholic burial Mass. I watched a NEWS FLASH about a gentleman who claims to have found real evidence that JESUS CHRIST once lived as a human being on “OUR” CREATED for all HUMANITY’S EARTH! What’s up with that? It seems the more people try and destroy our FAITH as a vital source of living life more completely. The more people PROVE it FACTUAL as a reason for living it with a consciousness centered on our integrity, dignity, and respectability. By that CFUSA means, for those of you who can’t, and more-so won’t try to understand us, and simply find FAITHFULNESS to GOD just plain old foolishness and crazziness! Believing SPIRITUALITY serves no purpose at all within our HUMAN LIVES on EARTH, is denying that we have a GOOD purpose for living it. Confirming that people like you “MY FRIEND” are already dead and you will remain dead to all of us as a believing FAITHFUL to GOD community forever. Jesus Christ told us himself while on EARTH:”It’s the BODY that will decay in the ground!” Maybe now you will comprehend what I (Willie) meant by educating people to learn about:”Getting beyond the CROSS of Jesus Christ!” Sorry to have to cut this communication short. But my cat whom we love so very much is hurt and we have to tend to his needs as best we can to lessen his pain!!!

  • J. Kent Borgaard

    As a 78 year old retired Pastoral Care person (parish pastor, hospital Director of Pastoral Care, and Psychiatric Center Pastoral Care Coordinator, I want to thank you for the kinds of coverage you have been providing, especially the most recent dialog on the “God Debate.”Now, is there any possibility that this might sometime be broadened even more by a similar treatment of the Integral approach being spearheaded by Ken Wilber, which manages to honor and respect about all of the major spiritual movements of the past few thousand years, and put them in an intellectual and spiritual healing-as-opposed-to-confrontational light. As you know, our survival as a species may well depend upon such a possibility … but only such a small percentage of that species has been made aware of the integral potential. And you have access to one of the best media purveyors of such possibilities around.J. Kent Borgaard

  • Theresa Fleming

    Dear Mr. Meachem:Regarding the recent articles from Newsweek such as “Is God real”? God is as real as the earth upon which we stand, which He created. And He loves us more than we could ever imagine, for we are His children.Was Jesus the Son of God? He was, is, and always will be the Son of God and the Savior for all those who choose to accept Him. His love knows no limits and it will go on for all eternity. His love does not recognize national boundaries or the color of a person’s skin, nor does He recognize political parties or any of the other many ways we divide ourselves. For Jesus loves every single person with a love so amazing and so complete that for over 2,000 years, millions have followed Him and millions more will continue to do so. Is Jesus the Son of God? There can be only one answer to such a question, and that answer is a resounding and absolute -yes. And no amount of debate will ever change that fact. Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God and the Savior of our World. He gave His all for us and one day He will return. Be ready.Sincerely,Theresa Fleming

  • Lynda Bucci Snodsmith

    Dear Mr. Meacham, Would you consider an article on the closing of Ursuline Academy in Springfield, Ill? What makes our sad story so unique is that we were closed by a Catholic college(Springfield College in Illinois) which is under the auspices of Benedictine University in Lisle, Ill. This truly is an interesting educational story. We are holding a candel light vigil on Wed.evening. Our students had to be told just prior to taking final exams….we are all saddened…….but the story is a remarkable one. Thank you for your time & consideration. Lynda Bucci Snodsmith…UA Alumni Board

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  • Barbara Greene

    A friend told me she had heard on TV that Mother Theresa had asked the friend to whom she had sent so many of her letters of the darkness, her doubts she so often went through be burned at the time of her death. Is it true she did not want her letters to be saved at all?If so, isn’t the publication of her letters a profound betrayal even though the Church could feel that it would be helpful to Christians?

  • Barbara Greene

    A friend told me she had heard on TV that Mother Theresa had asked the friend to whom she had sent so many of her letters of the darkness, her doubts she so often went through be burned at the time of her death. Is it true she did not want her letters to be saved at all?If so, isn’t the publication of her letters a profound betrayal even though the Church could feel that it would be helpful to Christians?

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  • Vic Fedorov

    I think what everyman thinks of religion ripe discussion, and jefferson’s comment a wry allusion to presidents and the afterlife.The press assumes everyone is getting another day, night.For when free assembly comes about, there will be a stillness indicative of the kingdom of god, that is a true great reality of earth, and the kingdom of god, as the phenoma it is, may be discussed, as churches attempt to discuss it beyond their service. In other words, the kingdom of god can be derived from peaceable free assembly.Why the press so ignorant? The Kingdom of heaven controlls it to be so. When will the press rise up and recesitate its focus on truth? Discuss the tenth amendment among yourselves. I’m sure you want to affirm the kingdom of god, even photograph it and print.

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  • candide

    What is infuriating about Meacham is that he pretends to be irenic, rational, reasonable, civil — until you challenge him on the historical falsities of orthodox Christianity and then he becomes a monster ready to light the pyres of the Inquisition.

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